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Hinduism and the environment

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Introduction

Front Cover................................................................ 1 Contents....................................................................... 2 Introduction............................................................... 3 Environmental Issues.................................................. 4- 7 Animal Rights........................................................... 8-9 Case Study................................................................ 10 Activist Groups....................................................... 11-12 Interview..................................................................13 Conclusion............................................................... 14 Glossary.................................................................. 15 Bibliography............................................................. 16 The main question I will be looking at answering is; how does Hinduism respond to environmental issues and animal rights? When looking at this I must look to answer many questions. I will include what science says about the environment and its reaction to any problems and how animals are treated in the world of science. In this I can talk about what science thinks about the environment and any other issues and I will also look at topics like vivisection. Along with the scientific views I will also look at showing Hindu views and evidence through Holy Scriptures. This project focuses on Hindu attitudes towards the Environment, environmental issues and animal rights. For this religious studies project I will focus on how Hindus feel about environmental issues such as recycling and wasting. I will also compare how Hindus who live in India and Hindus who live in the West (Western Europe and America) have many different attitudes and feeling towards environmental issues and animal rights I will also mention what certain activist groups are doing to protect the earth and the environment. I shall use quotes from many famous Hindus and from religious texts such as the Bhagavad-Gita and the Mahabharata as well as everyday prayers that focus on the subject. I will also be looking at anima rights in India which affects Hindu's and how it is viewed by Hindu's and Scientists in Europe. There are many environmental issues such as deforestation, pollution and acid rain so I will be looking at what Hinduism thinks about these issues and how science views these topics. Firstly I will be looking a how Hinduism refers to this topic then I will look at the scientific point of view. ...read more.

Middle

Now I will talk about animal rights and how this affects scientists in work such as vivisection and also what Hindu beliefs are on the subject. I will start by looking at different times where animal rights are involved such as vivisection, farming, hunting then more religious views which cover eating meat, the link between people and animals and ahisma. Science uses animal's everyday in experiments to test domestic products and other tests medically for the benefit for humans but there are many people who disagree with this and most Hindus come into this category. Most Hindus believe in ahisma and non-violence so animal testing is wrong in their beliefs. Most Hindus are vegetarian and would not eat any form of meat and may not even wear leather unless the cow died from natural causes. "Meat cannot be obtained without injury to animals, and the slaughter of animals obstructs the way to Heaven; let him therefore shun the use of meat." The Laws of Manu V, 45-52 This quote outlines that many Hindus will not eat meat as it cannot be obtained without the death of an animal. Hindus see divinity in all living creatures. Animal deities therefore, occupy an important place in Hindu dharma. Animals, for example, are very common as form of transport for various gods and goddesses. Animals also appear as independent divine creatures such as Lord Ganesha, the elephant son of Shiva, and Hanuman, the monkey-god that saved Sita. Hindus, in general, believe in total harmlessness to all living creatures and so naturally carry out Ahimsa. Many animals around the world are decapitated in slaughter houses and used as a product of food. If the animal is not fit enough to be food then its fur or skin is used for materials. Lamb is commonly used for wool, and the white lion is hunted for its fine, rare white coat. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that Hindus contradict with science in this topic completely as most Hindus believe in ahisma and that life is sacred so the environment should not be damaged which is shown in the fact that Hindus in India do not waste anything, partly due to poverty but they do not ruin the environment as those do in Europe. Hindus also have great respect for animals shown in the case study and the fact that most of the Hindus in India are vegetarians as meat can only be obtained through pain of animals and it may upset the balance of karma. Conclusively I feel that Hinduism beliefs on these topics are quite the opposite of science as science harms animals and the environment even though they know it is wrong and Hinduism is against harming animals and the environment although recently science has become aware of this. It is because of this I feel Hinduism fights against science to resolve animal and environmental issues. Ahimsa - non-violence, harmlessness; is doing no injury to any living creature. Brahman - God; the essence of all reality; the one truth of which all the deities are aspects. Dana - charitable giving. Laws of Manu - a code of conduct, traditionally written by Manu, the first man; it is also known as Manusmriti. Purusha Sukta - a piece of Hindu literature which tells the story of the creation of the world through the sacrifice of primeval man. Shiva - one of the most important deities of Hinduism, the 'lord of the dance', creator and destroyer. Trimurti - the three Hindu gods Brahma the creator, Vishnu the preserver and Shiva the destroyer, who together represent the whole of reality. Vedas - the oldest and most sacred texts of Hinduism > Hindu books on ahisma and the environment- religious books from library. > www.bbc.co.uk > www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize > www.channel4.com > en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinduism > www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/hinduism > http://hinduism.about.com > www.serv-online.org/Hinduism-quotations > online.sfsu.edu/~rone/Religion/religionanimals > www.bluecross.org.uk > www.animalaid.org.uk > www.greenpeace.org/international > www.cec.org ?? ?? ?? ?? - 1 - ...read more.

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