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History Coursework - Holidays In the Early Twentieth Century

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HISTORY COURSEWORK A) (i) Holidays in the early twentieth century for the majority of the working classes were greatly dominated by poverty. Source A recounts how many of the poorest in Blackpool took in visitors during the holiday periods in order to make ends meet. The working classes or such on a low wage were only able to go on holiday as other poor family provided low cost accommodation at their own expense, as the need for the income was so great and quite often essential. This meant the whole family including small children worked from noon till night providing the best stay they could at no extra cost just to keep custom. For the majority of the working classes this was a new and wonderful experience, as they had spent the majority of their lives working and had never been waited on in such a way. Food was basic, potatoes were provided at a small extra cost any additional food would have to be brought in, the amount one ate often reflected their financial status, those who really were on the most basic income would service mainly on the potatoes, those with maybe a little to spare could have a bit of meat or fish in addition. On such holidays the visitors would be massively packed in often with more than one person to a bed. Holidays in this period would not be considered easy in comparison with the kind we have become accustom yet, they provided a cheap and enjoyable break from the basic, toilsome day to day life, Unfortunately this was only possible by the exploitation of another group of people. ...read more.


Finally their was a government that cared about it's people, and it is possible, that this government promoted this message by producing material such as source D that demonstrated just how much they had improved peoples lives. Question D; part (i) Sources E, F, G, H and I can all be used as evidence to demonstrate just how much holidays have changed since the second world war. One substantial difference is the continual increase in the expectance we have of holidays. Prior to the second world war holidays were considered a luxury, for example things like sharing beds would have been greatly excepted amongst the working classes at that time, today however even the thought would horrify the majority of us. Source I can be used to support this, the source expresses one woman's anger when in 1972 one holiday company failed to produce a room with a window, the woman was simply outraged, it is only when we then compare this source to one such as source A the dramatic change becomes apparent. Source I also tells how people were made to wait for there rooms to become available, but to day any slight delay would be classed as a major inconvenience and often result in a complaint. Before the war you would have taken your holiday when you were told and if you could afford to, but in modern society most people are able to pick and choose when they want to go on holiday and how long they want to go for, to a certain point. This change is shown in source G when everything shut down and if you could afford to travel at that point you would. ...read more.


The figures in sources C and D no longer exist with people able to afford time off work and with a greater disposable income to spend, they can afford to spend this money on tourist industries which is why holidays are so important to the British economy. With the amount of money people can afford to spend, the tourism industry/ economy can only grow. The development of the travel industry caused an incredible boost to the British economy and gradually Britain has gone from a manufacturing - economy to a service economy. Before the travel industry became accomplished Britain main source of income came from the manufacturing of goods, however as the rate at which Britain produced these goods has declined we have created wealth through providing a service. Today the travel industry is a large and essential proportion of Britain's economy. Although it is not only Britain who benefited financially from the travel industry, by generating income in convertible currencies, the world's fastest growing industry had become a lifeline for the economies of many of the world's poorer countries. Tourism also spread western money, western fashions and ideas of personal freedom to countries as diverse as Thailand Turkey and the Gambia. By 1974 it was estimated tourists were spending $29 billion a year, 6% of the total value of international trade. The travel industry is continually developing, and experimenting with new ideas and incredibly still continues to grow. The importance of holidays can only continue to grow, with time spent at work increasing and time spent at home or relaxing decreasing. the economy can only benefit from people going on holiday, and expand from what is all ready a large part of the British economy. ...read more.

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