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How Much Was Agriculture Changed By the War in The Years 1939-1950

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Introduction

HOW MUCH WAS AGRICULTURE CHANGED BY THE WAR IN THE YEARS 1939-1950 HOW MUCH WAS AGRICULTURE CHANGED BY THE WAR IN THE YEARS 1939-1950 In 1939, when the war began, Britain was importing 70% of its food. Soon German submarines and U-boats were sinking large numbers of merchant ships. Agriculture became as important to Britains survival as the manufacture of armaments. The greatest need was for more home-produced grain. In 1939 the British Government set up a War Agriculture Committee in each county. The committee laid down targets for individual farmers, while the Government paid welfare of �2 per acre to farmers who ploughed up grassland and sowed corn crops. Arable land was thus increased by half. Wastelands and playing fields could be cleared with bulldozers and planted with rows of potatoes. Roadside borders were used in emergency. Farmers were encouraged to reduce stocks of poultry, sheep and pigs. Cattle was to remain the same, as they were necessary to maintain the milk supplies. ...read more.

Middle

Farmers could share their stories on problems and discoveries. The Second World War developments almost amounted to a second revolution. Machines generally did more work with a higher efficiency, but they still didn't make up for the numbers of farmers missing during the war, farmers were given the choice of whether to stay and farm, or to join the forces. The Government couldn't rely wholly on prisoners of war and children to help the farmers. Women were encouraged to join the Women's Land Army. The 'land girls' lived on the farms they were allocated to. The women did the work of thousands of farm labourers who had joined the armed forces. To join the land army, you had to be aged 17-40 and be strong and healthy. You also had to be fully committed to the service. The women's land army was started in 1917 and added 33,000 women to the 80,000 already working as agriculture labourers. ...read more.

Conclusion

O Daisy dear! That moo must mean: "You've never milked a cow before!" I know I've not, but still, I'm keen- Good-bye, I'm off to milk some more! Daphne J. Poole W.L.A 36759, Herts Magazines played a big part in women morale. They suggested advice in difficult situations, and advised on fashion items etc. Agricultural benefits were continued throughout the war and thereafter. Britain was producing more livestock than ever and was manufacturing three times as much of its own home-grown grain. Additional benefits were also available. Farmers could be given a grant for things such as the improvement of land drainage and the reconstruction of bombed buildings etc. In an attempt to secure farmers into agricultural developments such as buying further advanced equipment, i.e. machines and tools etc. The Government passed 'The Agricultural Act 1947'. This act, was a set plan for the future. Guaranteed prices for a range of products on offer were laid down. By 1950 Britain was probably the most mechanised farming industry in the world. ...read more.

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