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How public and private sectors have impact on each other in tourism industry?

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Introduction

How public and private sectors have impact on each other in tourism industry? Introduction In the field of psychology, there is a new symptom investigated for tourism called "euphoria" indicating a kind of emotion, that is, the enthusiasm of the destination residents towards the tourists (Xie: 2001). As a matter of fact, nowadays tourism itself has become a kind of popular "disease" which spreads throughout the whole world just like the Europe Black Death in the Middle Ages. No one can escape from it, neither the poor nor the rich (Ryan: 1991). A cured disease will do good to new disease in the future, nevertheless, the ignorance of it will destroy the entire world. Similarly, tourism, viewed as fastest growing industry, would bring lots of significant economic and social values to the development of every country. Thus, this "modern disease" should be cautiously treated for sustainability and managed by every country so that maximum benefit can be derived and negative impacts can be minimized towards the "euphoria" local people, culture and environment from the tourism. It indicates that tourism related organizations including international, national, regional with both inter-governmental and non-governmental interests should pay attention to the development of sustainable tourism which trying to "coordinate the complex interactions between the tourism industry, visitors, the environment and the host communities." (Testoni: 2001). Therefore, this essay is designed to firstly discuss the roles all these kinds of organizations played into the sustainable tourism development and their impacts on each other. Moreover, with the roles and impacts of both public- and private-sectors clearly clarified, how these roles and impacts would have power in enhancing the growth of tourism, that is, the well-ordered plan strongly needed for achieving tourism goals has become the key problem of sustainable tourism development. Agreed by Testoni (2001), planning began to be more important in facilitating the development of tourism while minimizing negative impacts and realizing sustainability. ...read more.

Middle

Local governments would state their plans of constructing major amenities thanks to the importance of high quality of amenities. As Collier explained that the relative quality and availability of amenities including infrastructure and superstructure might be the cause of the choice of destination of tourists. Government usually investing in the establishment of infrastructure, comprised of roads, electricity and water supplies, sewerage and waste disposal, communication facilities, airports and harbours, transportation networks, healthy care facilities and security systems (Mill: 1990), because the "development of infrastructure should precede the development of superstructure" (Collier: 2003). Besides, they try to strength the quality of tourism facilities so as to meet the needs of tourists. 3. Environmental management. Governments adopt a lots of measures to protect the local environment and prevent the pollution. 4. Promotion of the country or a certain region as a tourist destination and research. Advertisements, marketing methods such as marketing segment that is divide tourist into different areas of target markets, pricing tools, holding activities and events as attractions are various promotional tools used by government to develop a certain destination to attract consumers. For example, government would support an event of attraction as entertainment such as American Cup in New Zealand. 5. Training and educating the tourism employees. With the understanding of the significance of plans for tourism development and the degree of government intervention into the plans, the case of how New Zealand government reacts to the guidance of International Tourism Organisation would be specifically lucubrated. First of all, a main strategy that could maximize the benefit of tourism and minimize the negative impact would be decided. Tourism has been viewed as the main economic source of the GDP of a country. As Simpson (2002) noted, New Zealand has recently produced its 10-year tourism strategy to accentuate a positivist attitude towards further tourism development, which particularly takes the "economic" approach to treat tourism as an economically based and industry-oriented concept. ...read more.

Conclusion

Reference: Brackenbury, M. (2002). UNEP and The Private Sector, Special Side Event. Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.world-tourism.org Collier, A. (2003). Principles of Tourism, Anew Zealand Perspective. 6th edition, Addison, Wesley Longman New Zealand limited. Font, X. (2002). Environmental Certification In Tourism and Hospitality: Progress, Process and Prospects. Journal of Tourism Management. Vol. 23. pp. 197-205. Guest, C. & Taylor, P. (1999). Customer Oriented Public Leisure Services In The United Kingdom. Journal of Managing Leisure. Vol. 4. pp. 94-105. Jagmohan, D. (2003) Private Sector To Play Instrumental Role In Tourism. Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.expresstravelandtourism.com/20020228/tradetalk6.shtml Marino, A. (2001). The Tourist Sector: Public Versus Private-The Italian and Spainish Experience. Journal of Tourism Management. Vol. 22. pp. 43-48. Mill, R. C. (1990). Tourism, The International Business. United States of America: Prentice Hall Career & Technology Prentice-Hall, Inc. Pearce, D. G. (2000). Tourism Plan Reviews: Methodological Considerations and Issues From Samoa. Journal of Tourism Management. Vol. 21, pp191-203. Roehl, W. S. & Swerdlow, S. (2001). Sex Differences In Hotel Employee Training In The Western United States. Journal of Pacific Tourism Review. Vol. 5. pp. 143-148. Ryan, C. (1991). Recreational Tourism: A Social Science Perspective. Routledge. Simpson, K. (2002). Tourism Planning At Subnational Levels: A New Zealand Case Study. Journal of Pacific Tourism Review. Vol. 6. pp. 3-21. Testoni, L. (2001). Planning For Sustainable Tourism. Journal of Pacific Tourism Review. Vol. 4, pp. 191-199. Thiibault, L. & Frisby, W. (1999). Interorganisational Linkages In The Delivery Of Local Leisure Services In Canada: Responding To Economic, Political and Social Pressures. Journal of Managing Leisure. Vol. 4. pp. 125-141. WTO. (1991). Recommendation 29. World Tourism Organisation, Madrid. WTO-Sustainable Development of Tourism (n.d.) Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.world-tourism.org/sustainable/IYE-Main-Menu.htm WTO-UNEP Concept Paper - International Year of Ecotourism 2002. (n.d.). Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.world-tourism.org Xie, Y. J. (2001). Basic Tourism : Social Impact On Tourism. Beijing: China Tourism Press. Yunis, E. (2003). Sustainable Development of Tourism. Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.world-tourism.org ...read more.

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