• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How successful was Labour's programme of nationalisation? Labour's programme of nationalisation was based on the concept of state ownership

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How successful was Labour's programme of nationalisation? Labour's programme of nationalisation was based on the concept of state ownership of industries, enabling the government to control the "means of production, distribution and exchange." It began to be implemented in 1945 at the end of the Second World War, under the general direction of Herbert Morrison, with a primary aim of creating more efficient planning and co-operation between industries, whilst improving relations between workers and employers. Thus, for the purpose of this essay, the successfulness of the Labour programme of nationalisation will refer to whether or not it met the aim of making industries more efficient and integrated. Labour faced major economic struggles at the end of the war and yet put its plans to restore industries straight into action. This may been seen as a mistake, with many claiming if they had waited until debts had been repaid, with the economy back on track, their attempts to make industries more efficient through nationalisation would have been far more successful. ...read more.

Middle

Thus the programmes plan for industries to be more integrated was not met, hinting that the programme was unsuccessful. The nationalisation of the coal (1947) and railways (1948) prevented these industries from almost certain collapse. By nationalising the coal industry, the government took ownership of approximately 1500 collieries and 400 smaller mines, which were to be controlled by the National Coal Board. The Conservatives criticized this action stating that the industry had over three quarters of a million workers, and was simply too large to be controlled centrally. Although by nationalising the coal industry Labour prevented its collapse, the Conservatives were later proven correct, with the National Coal Board failing to deal with the coal shortage in its opening year. Railways also faced problems after nationalisation. Although Labour's plan had been to create a more efficient transport network, railways were criticised for many reasons including punctuality, cleanliness, cost and overall efficiency. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, I feel that nationalisation was successful in the short term, helping industries to keep going. However, this was at the expense of the treasury and Labour's resources were soon drained, supported by the fact that it later refused to subsidise the coal industry and it soon collapsed. In my opinion nationalisation was never going to work over a long period, thus I feel Labour's aim to make industries fully efficient through nationalisation was impossible to meet. Although Labour's nationalisation programme failed to make industries efficient, considering the vast amount of problems faced, it was the most successful effort possible. Moreover, nationalisation did help save industries from collapsing and therefore to an extent was successful as it allowed industry to continue. However, in the context of this essay, nationalisation failed to meet its aims of improved efficiency and more integrated industry and therefore was unsuccessful. ?? ?? ?? ?? Naomi Caney 2 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Production - Location & Change section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Production - Location & Change essays

  1. How successful was Stalin's attempt to industrialise the Soviet Union?

    Success was certainly present in the development of heavy industries, although the rate could have been easily faster. As heavy industries grew rapidly, consumer goods were ignored in the First Five Year Plan. Textile production actually declined during the FFYP largely due to the collapse in livestock numbers and the

  2. Assignment on Computer Integrated Manufacturing

    One of the reasons that CIM developed quickly was due to the demands of the marketplace for greater variety of product at better quality and lower prices. In the 1960s and 1970s, manufacturers could deal with such a problem by slashing their direct labor costs, by usually moving operations overseas to countries with lower wages [1].

  1. Development Essay - BRAZIL

    Most of the industry is based in the south and southeast. The northern part seems to be the poorest part of Brazil, but is being reshaped. The most important development plan that Brazil is undertaking currently is the "Real" plan, (named after the new currency)

  2. How can famines be prevented?

    For these governments who continually engage in war and witness death so frequently it is difficult for them to become sensitive to their people dying from hunger. Every penny spent on war means one less for development programs and strategic policies to combat and prevent famines.

  1. Is Biological Pest Control Better Than Chemical Control?

    Herbicides have had a great effect on ecosystems throughout the world. Weeds are the food of many primary consumers. There are many instances where not only have the weeds disappeared but so have primary consumers, such as butterflies, which depend on them.

  2. To what extent was the iron industry 'transformed' between 1750-1830?

    �2.00 a tonne (C.K Hyde), and therefore the innovation was slow to be adopted until this time. As late as the turn of the century, Britain was still importing a massive 53,000 tonnes of iron from Sweden (Mitchell and Deane), and imported materials still remained of a much higher quality,

  1. Is biological pest control better than chemical pest control?

    Another way in which aphids can effect crops are, that as the aphids suck in the sap if that crop was diseased they could pick up the disease or virus and then go suck on another plant which would then pass the disease or virus on, which would spread the

  2. "The expansion of heavy industry from c1850 was the key point in making Britain ...

    great impact, as the labour productivity only increased by a few percent over the 64-year timespan. However impressive the growth of certain branches of production, the overall performance of the British economy during the period 1850-1914 that emerges from recent numerical exercises has appeared modest: a few percent per year

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work