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I am trying to find out how footpath erosion on Pen Y Fan which is a national park, compares to footpath erosion on Cock Marsh which is in a village and is not in a national park.

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Introduction

Section 1 I am trying to find out how footpath erosion on Pen Y Fan which is a national park, compares to footpath erosion on Cock Marsh which is in a village and is not in a national park. The question is 'how does footpath erosion on Pen Y Fan compare to footpath erosion on Cock Marsh'. Backround information on Pen Y Fan and the Brecon Beacons The Brecon Beacons is a lived and worked in national park. The area within the national park covers 519 square miles. Nearly half of this is 1,000 ft above sea level. Pen Y Fan is the highest mountain in South Wales and is 2,907 ft above sea level. The Brecon Beacons also has other peaks such as cribyn and corn Du. the east of the brecon beacons are known as the black mountains. In the far west of the national park is the upland range known as Black Mountain. This is a remote location and has a well-known ridge walk called the beacon horseshoe. In the south there is a place called waterfall country and in the north is sennybridge. Pen Y Fan has a problem with footpath erosion due to walkers walking over the footpath with heavy walking boots which pulls up mud and vegetation and it falls off in a different area. ...read more.

Middle

There is a bridge, which you can go over to get to cock marsh from the Thames path. You can also access Cock Marsh with the use of a boat, as there are jetties close to cock marsh to the North. Map in folder goes here dumbass. Data Interpretation. We conducted the first study at Pen y Fan. We measured the width and depth of the footpath at different points up the slope. We took clinometer readings and quadrat estimates. We did the same as this at Cock Marsh. On both tests we counted the amount of people walking down the path. For Pen Y Fan it was 92 people including us, and on Cock Marsh it was 12 people including us (4) and 6 dogs. We were at both sites for about the same amount of time (around 5 hours). My information shows that the footpath at Pen Y Fan was wider than the Cock Marsh footpath (see footpath transects). My data from the quadrat shows that cock marsh has more grass on the left of the footpath than Pen Y Fan, but Pen Y Fan has more grass on the right and in the centre. Also my data shows that Pen Y Fan has more stones on the left and centre while Cock Marsh has more stones on the right. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think that my investigation did all it was supposed to. The data that was most useful to my investigation were the footpath transects to show the depth of the footpath because you could easily compare the depth of the Pen Y Fan footpath to the depth of the Cock Marsh footpath. The least useful information was the clinometer readings because the angle of slope was not as important as the depth and width and vegetation of the footpath. Other information that would have been useful would be more photos to show the footpath, also to know the vegetation around the footpath would have been useful because then I would know whether people are trying to escape the rocks on the footpath and walking to the side of the footpath. I think that my results were quite accurate, but not exactly accurate, because the data that I collected was only in one day and by the time this fieldwork is handed in the data may have changed, as more people would be walking up and down the footpaths. I think that to answer my original question "how footpath erosion on Pen Y Fan compares to footpath erosion on Cock Marsh" I collected enough information without any problems. To each technique there are disadvantages, such as the quadrat data collection technique you cannot get an exact reading because half of the square may be full of grass and the other half may be full of stone. ...read more.

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