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I will compare and contrast some of the problems experienced by the two mega cities, Lima and Tokyo. Two absolutely different cities located on two different continents, have to cope with some similar problems.

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Introduction

I will compare and contrast some of the problems experienced by the two mega cities, Lima and Tokyo. Two absolutely different cities located on two different continents, have to cope with some similar problems. Peru source:www.mapquest.com Japan source:www.mapquest.com In the first part of this report I will compare and try to find similarities between problems experienced by this two cities. In the second part I will contrast the problems. You will see that for example the housing problem in Tokyo is very different to the one in Lima. The third part of the report will contain information about the attempts ,of the governments, of solving the problems. The last part of the report will be the conclusion, which Will contain my concluding statement List of references and sources attached. The problem of transport The public transportation is run at the limit of its safety and capacity in both cities . Public transport in Lima is mainly in the hands of large numbers of small enterprises. The owners of the small companies are using very small ,old and as a result of this, very dangerous vehicles. It is a well known fact that only the half of the employed drivers hold a driving license. ...read more.

Middle

Sources: 1) The mega-city in Latin America, by Alan Gilbert Article: "Lima: mega-city and mega-problem" ,part: growth 2) Emerging world cities in Pacific Asia by Fu-Chen Lo & Yue-man Yeung Article: "Changing Asia-Pacific world-cities", part: New agglomeration and "Tokyo problems". Lima: Population growth, 1940-1993 Table 1.0 Lima Population (000s) Annual growth rate 1940 649 1961 1,846 5.1 1972 3,303 5.5 1981 4,608 3.1 1993 6,423 2.7 Source :Inei, 1994 Un- and underemployment in Lima (percentage of economically active population) Table 1.1 1979 1990 1993 Unemployment 6.5 8.3 9.6 Underemployment 33.0 73.1 77.6 Satisfactorily employed 60.6 18.6 12.8 Source: Ministerio de Trabajo, Household surveys Housing Both of the mega cities have to cope with a serious housing problem, but the problem "housing" is very different in this two cities. People with a low income in Lima live in so called barriadas. Also known as "young towns". 1961 17% of Lima's population was forced to live in barriadas, because the government was investing in the middle-class. The only thing authorities did for the very poor was giving them some dessert land. There were small communities who were building the "young towns". ...read more.

Conclusion

They are investing in the surrounding and into the developing water front of the city. The government is promoting decentralisation. They want to redistribute the business centres themselves over the area, linking them to each other with high-tech-based telecommunications networks and rapid transit systems. The Metropolitan Government demonstrated its determination by moving its governmental office from the crowded centre area to the new business centre in Shinjuku which is located outside the centre. The work on the decentralisation is a way to try to solve the enormous traffic and transport problem. Source: Emerging world cities in Pacific Asia by Fu-Chen Lo & Yue-man Yeung Article: "Changing Asia-Pacific world-cities", part: New agglomeration and "Tokyo problems". Conclusion My opinion is that the rapid increase of population in this two mega-cities is the cause of their problems. Both of them, especially Lima are not prepared for the flood of people moving in. Natural resources, living space, and services are coming to the limit of capacity. I think that decentralisation is the only way managing the situation. Lima's government should act as the authorities in Tokyo and support the development of the surroundings of the city. If the process of decentralisation will not happen fast enough both cities will collapse. ...read more.

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