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In this essay I intend to show that the video, 'Day Return, Labyrinth of filth', portrays an accurate picture of what the living and working conditions were like during The Nineteenth Century.

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Introduction

Ian Chaffey 11DH/11H 18th January, 2001 History Coursework In this essay I intend to show that the video, 'Day Return, Labyrinth of filth', portrays an accurate picture of what the living and working conditions were like during The Nineteenth Century. In the 'Day Return, Labyrinth of filth' living conditions are presented as very poor, dirty, over crowded and very unhealthy. The video shows children living on the streets begging for to money to pay for their next meal. The video portrays that millions of people lived in filth and dirt, but sources show that this is not entirely true. There were many thousands living in very dirty living conditions but not millions. A population report shows that between 1801-1851 the population grew to just 46,382 people (of all ages). Below is the official report produced by the government during this period. ...read more.

Middle

Many people died from cholera. Below is a table showing how many people died from cholera. Year Cholera deaths in Merthyr 1832 160 1849 1,467 1854 455 1866 229 Total No. of people killed from cholera 2,311 The houses above are third class houses. Any third class house would have three families living in it at any one time. One family would live upstairs, one downstairs and one in the basement/cellar. Second class houses are only different in terms of size and space but they were still dirty, unhealthy and had no running water. Only one family occupied second-class houses. Even first class houses were very unclean and had no strip of garden, no backdoor or outlet, no toilet, no drain to carry away house refuse and no pump or pipe for the supply of water. When renting these houses there are three different categories. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the Ironworks most people worked a week of nights and a weeks of days, both 12-hour shifts. The working conditions were very cramped, dim, dirty, cold and extremely dangerous. There were many dangers involved in jobs in the ironworks, some more serious than others. Some of the dangers were burning, suffocation and being crushed on the rolling machines or if the roof collapsed in with the earth shattering explosions to free the iron. Below is a record of the total number of people working in the Plymouth works in 1842 Total Workforce 2,225 Number of workers under 18 years: Aged between 13-18 years: 470 Aged under 13 years 265 Total Aged under 18 years 735 From the evidence that I have studied I conclude that the video 'Day Return, Labyrinth of Filth' does not present an accurate picture of Merthyr during the Nineteenth Century. Some of the information portrayed in the film is correct but a lot is over exaggerated and added on to make the film more interesting. ...read more.

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