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Introduction to heritage tourism.

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Introduction

Heritage Tourism- An Introduction Saturday November 8th 2003 City Hotel 0930- Introduction to Heritage Tourism-Corinthian Room 0945- Classification of Heritage Attractions-Corinthian Room (See page 1) 0950- The National Trust- Hervey Suite (See pages 2-4) - The Trust's role - Guest Speakers - Question and Answer Session 1010- The Environment & Heritage Service-Berkeley Suite (See page 5) - The EHS's role - Guest Speakers - Question and Answer Session 1030- Break 1100- The Wildlife Trust- McCorkell Suite- (See page 6) - The Trusts Role - Guest Speakers - Question and Answer Session 1115- Guided Tour of the Walls 1215- Lunch (available in hotel) 1315- Panel Discussion 1330- Closing Remarks 1345- End of seminar 0945- Classification of Heritage Attractions In Northern Ireland heritage tourism attractions can be classified in many different ways. These include manmade but not built to attract tourists attractions, manmade and purpose built to attract tourists attractions, natural attractions and can also be applied to special events. It is hoped that this seminar will help people to gain a wider understanding and appreciation of heritage tourism and the efforts of the bodies who do so much excellent work in order to protect and preserve Northern Ireland's rich heritage attractions. Manmade but not built to attract tourist heritage attractions include the Walls of Derry which were built in 1613 to protect the inhabitants from hostile enemies. They fulfilled their purpose during the siege by the Jacobites and defended the city for more than a hundred days until the siege ended. ...read more.

Middle

T The Dining Room Mount Stewart Another popular property is Florencecourt in County Fermanagh. It was previously the home of the Enniskillen family and was given to the National Trust by the fifth Earl of Enniskillen in 1953. It is also of natural importance as on its grounds is the first Yew Tree was planted here in 1767. The land around the house is owned by the Forest Service which purchased the land from the sixth Earl of Enniskillen in 1975. Florence Court, County Fermanagh In County Antrim the Trust owns the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. It was primarily used as a way for fishermen to Carrick-a-Rede Island. Over one hundred thousand tourists visit the bridge every year. It is also an excellent place to view porpoises, dolphins and basking sharks. Carrick- a-Rede Rope Bridge The Giant's Causeway is the most popular heritage attraction in Northern Ireland and is the only UNESCO World Heritage Site in Ireland. More than five hundred thousand tourists a year visit the area from around the world. Over sixty million years old it was formed by lava flowing into the sea and gradually cooling and hardening. In 2002 the Giant's Causeway and Bushmills Railway opened more than fifty years after its predecessor the Giants Causeway, Portrush and Bush Valley Tramway closed. The line runs from the Giant's Causeway to Bushmills. The Causeway is also an important area for wildlife including peregrine falcons and a rare species of bird known as chough. ...read more.

Conclusion

No member of the trust is paid as all of its members volunteer to help the Trust. The Trust cares for more than two thousand nature reserves. There were four hundred thousand voluntary members of the Trust in 2002 and the member is still growing. Membership costs �24 a year for one person and �36 per annum for a family membership. They have 47 local trusts and a trust for children known as the Wildlife Watch who work together to protect wildlife in different areas from cities to the countryside especially in national and country parks. The local trust in Northern Ireland is the Ulster Wildlife Trust and was founded in 1978. In Northern Ireland there are more than 2000 members of the Trust. Their main aim is to "help people recognise that a healthy environment, rich in wildlife and managed on sustainable principles, is essential for continued human existence." WWF The World Wide Fund for Nature's main aims are to protect and conserve endangered species and to address global threats to wildlife. However it only works to protect animals in the wild and has "no experience or expertise to deal with issues relating to animals in captivity. Whereas the larger organisation works on international issues relating to animals the UK organisation work to look after the countries wild animals. It can be involved in many matters affecting wildlife such as challenging the government on the destruction of the countryside. It also puts forward the effects of tourism in wildlife. Unlike other heritage organisations it owns no property and therefore has more money to spend. 1 ...read more.

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