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It is logical to think that the hazards impact depends on a countries level of development. For example, a hazard in a MEDC might cause huge amounts of damage because of the costs of buildings there

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Introduction

Discuss the view that the impact of hazards depends on a countries level of development. It is logical to think that the hazards impact depends on a countries level of development. For example, a hazard in a MEDC might cause huge amounts of damage because of the costs of buildings there and the amount of people located in one small area. On the other hand in a LEDC the hazard may cause more damage because the people are less developed and the buildings are less adapted to resist a hazard. When thinking about earthquakes we have to take into consideration the infrastructure of the MEDC and LEDC in question. Certain MEDCs that experience frequent earthquakes try to make their buildings 'earthquake-proof'. ...read more.

Middle

And despite their attempts to earthquake proof buildings the economic damage was still massive, with highways such as the Hanshin Highway collapsing, and many buildings being damaged or destroyed. When we compare this with the earthquake that struck India, the results are very different. The Bhuj earthquake that shook the Indian Province of Gujarat on the morning of January 26, 2001 (Republic Day) is one of the two most deadly earthquakes to strike India in its recorded history. One month after the earthquake official Government of India figures place the death toll at 19,727 and the number of injured at 166,000. Indications are that 600,000 people were left homeless, with 348,000 houses destroyed and an additional 844,000 damaged. ...read more.

Conclusion

Armero, Colombia, destroyed by lahar on November 13, 1985.More than 23,000 people were killed in Armero when lahars (volcanic debris flows) swept down from the erupting Nevado del Ruiz volcano. When the volcano became restless in 1984, no team of volcanologists existed that could rush to the scene of such an emergency. However, less than a year later, the U.S. Geological Survey organized a team and a portable volcano observatory that could be quickly dispatched to an awakening volcano anywhere in the world. So when we compare hazards in general with LEDCs and MEDCs, the pattern seems to be the same. In LEDCs the cost of life is often greater than in those of the LEDCs, however the economic damage, despite large losses of buildings, is somewat insignificant to those of the MEDCs, who pay large amounts of money to protect lives and buildings. ...read more.

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