• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

It may seem that the spice trade in ancient times and modern production of conventional foods have nothing in common, but many similarities can be found between them.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Ancient and Modern Times - Spices and Food The spice trade is a commercial activity involving many countries; it dates back to the ancient times. The Roman Empire?s ancient spice trade comprised the trading of spices, incense, and herbs. Modern production of conventional foods, on the other hand, is an industry that usually involves using various chemicals during the process. At first sight, ancient spice trade and conventional food production might not have anything in common; however, The Omnivore?s Dilemma - a Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan and Spice: The History of a Temptation by Jack Turner present a plethora of examples that draw many similarities between those two industries. The first trait that links the ancient spice trade with modern food production is the presence of one dominant ingredient in almost every product. In ancient times, Romans used pepper - one of the most valued spices then - in most of their dishes. In De re coquinaria (Cookbook) ...read more.

Middle

Obviously, pepper was as prevalent in ancient times as corn is now in the production of conventional food. The second characteristic shared by both the ancient spice trade and conventional food production is that both industries are economically unsustainable. In ancient times, Romans possessed an enormous craving for spices. This obsession originated from the traditional spicy cuisine (Turner, 70) as well as the message that spices conveyed - wealth and power (Turner, 68). The Romans? hunger for spices led to the eventual collapse of the whole country. Since Romans traded non-renewable goods (gold and silver coins) for the renewable ones (spices), they eventually ran out of means to satisfy their spice carving. This weakened the monetary value, and resulted in economic crisis (Turner, 80) followed by the downfall of the Roman Empire (Turner, 83). This clearly authenticates the notion that the spice trade was not able to endure. Nowadays, industrial food production, based on maize, also deals with the issue of economic instability. ...read more.

Conclusion

The cost of letting the market collapse is too high. Yet, what will happen if there is a economic recession grand enough to deprive the government of its means to support the corn market? A recession comparable to the one in Germany after the Second World War, when tens of millions had nothing to eat or wear is feasible. The Great Depression in the United States in 1929-1932, when the unemployment increased more than 600% could also happen. The industry will definitely break down. Until then, however, the conventional food production will still flourish as it has been for the past few decades. To conclude, it may seem that the spice trade in ancient times and modern production of conventional foods have nothing in common, but many similarities can be found between them. Both of them contain a dominant ingredient, and they are both economically unstable. One of them, the ancient spice trade, has already collapsed. The conventional food production, however, will still have to wait until the government runs out of means to support it, before it faces its own downfall. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition essays

  1. The issue of globalization has been an ongoing process that raised many questions in ...

    Peripheral countries are structurally constrained to experience a kind of development that reproduces their subordinate status. The differential strength of the multiple states within the system is crucial to maintain the system as a whole, because strong states reinforce and increase the differential flow of surplus to the core zone.

  2. 'There is nothing in the Montessori prepared environment that is there by chance.' Discuss.

    - * Secret of Childhood, Chap 18, Education of the child, page 113-118. * Montessori A modern approach, Chap 1, Historical Introduction to Montessori, page 1-7. Continued on next page Purpose of a prepared environment, Continued Freedom Element design and purpose The overriding objective of the prepare environment is to

  1. How likely does it seem that the Millennium Development Goals will be met by ...

    a minimum, of 30% of Uganda's parliament must be women. One of the major issues facing the success of MDG3, is that it is so involved in the cultures of certain societies, and for this reason makes it harder to change.

  2. Examine the ways in which the unique indigenous lifestyles found in wilderness areas are ...

    A relatively new variant, ecotourism is described as environment-friendly, sustainable and nature-based. It came about as a response to the world's growing environmental awareness. This activity involves "visiting relatively undisturbed natural areas with the aim of studying, admiring and enjoying the scenery, wild plants and animals, as well as any existing cultural aspects."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work