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Japan is a country that distinguishes itself by being one of the most geologically unstable places in the world. It has 40 active volcanoes and records 1500 tremors annually, most of which are minor.

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Introduction

For an example you have studied, Describe the origin/causes, Effects and attempted solutions for your Hazard type Japan is a country that distinguishes itself by being one of the most geologically unstable places in the world. It has 40 active volcanoes and records 1500 tremors annually, most of which are minor. The last great earthquake to strike Japan was the Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, which killed 142,800 people in Tokyo alone. The size and scale of this earthquake shifted most of Japan's modern seismic attention to the north of Japan. Little focus of attention for earthquakes was paid to south-central Japan, since it had been without a major quake in over 900 years. But, on Tuesday, January 17th 1995, at 5:46 a.m. an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.2 on the Richter scale struck the city of Kobe. At the time Kobe had a population of 1.5 million people and was supposedly one of the most quake-safe cites in Japan. In spite of the fact that the ground shook for only 20 seconds, Kobe suffered great amounts of geological, structural, social and economical damage. The people of Kobe although in shock, surprisingly remained unmoving. But at the same time they also felt they had been betrayed by a country that had prided itself on being seismically prepared for so long, when it fact it was not. ...read more.

Middle

The earthquake and fires killed 5,250 people and left over 400,000 people homeless. Those that did survive the quake were freezing because there was no gas for heat. Also they were thirsty and starving due to the lack of food/water being circulated. The people of Kobe had lost more in 20 seconds than most people lose in a lifetime. Yet, they surprisingly remained quiet and unmoved. The majority of people did not yell or become hysterical, but rather utter words like, "Shoganai" meaning it cannot be helped. An elderly man sitting in front of his shattered house with a flask in his hand said, "Everything is gone, what can I do except sip and smile?" Although Japan is a country that shuns direct attacks, some people had had enough of inactiveness. One survivor stated, "Many had to watch our homes burn down without a fireman in sight. Then we have to go without food and water because the authorities are so disorganized." The people of Kobe were miserable and somewhat angry, but not because their homes were demolished, but because their country which had prided itself on being seismically prepared was, in fact, as unprepared as anywhere else in the world. ...read more.

Conclusion

On Tuesday, January 17th 1995, at 5:46 a.m. an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.2 on the Richter scale struck the city of Kobe. At the time Kobe had a population of 1.5 million people and was supposedly one of the most quake-safe cites in Japan. In spite of the fact that the ground shook for only 20 seconds, Kobe suffered great amounts of geological, structural, social and economical damage. The people of Kobe although in shock, surprisingly remained solid and unmoved. At the same time they also felt they had been betrayed by a country that had prided itself on being seismically prepared for so long, when it fact it wasn't. The authorities of Kobe have realized that the illusion of preparedness was the key to their failure. Not only have all new buildings become more earthquake resistant but authorities have also established a restoration fund, which through investment will yield 350 billion yen over 10 years, just in case any other devastating events occur. Additionally Authorities are thankful for all the international support during the time of crisis and in return are reusing all temporary housing units to help support international earthquake victims. The Great Honshu quake brought to light the fact that every city in Japan is just as earthquake prone as the other, and therefore safety measures should not just be concentrated in specific areas of the country. ...read more.

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