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managing special event

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Introduction

ANDY IM Group C Managing Special Events Word count: Contents page *Page1: Introduction, overview. *Page2-3: Surveying *Page 4: Special Events and Business *Page 5-6: Positive impacts and negative impacts *Page 6-7: Conclusion *Page 7: Map of the Clipsal 500 and Bibliography *Introduction Today, there are many special events, which are important to the tourism industry. A few years ago there were not many events but within the last 10 years there has been a boost in the tourism industry. Loyal communities and businesses have developed; the hospitality industry has improved as the president of the hotel association of South Australia has commented to the Advertiser on the 13th of March 2006 that they have done maximum business during these popular events. That is why the following assignment will examine the positive and negative impacts on the tourism industry at these special events. *Overview The general overview of this assignment is to examine the types of reasons why people go to these special events and the positive and negative impacts these events have on the community. Events such as the Clipsal500, Fringe Festival, WomAdelaide, Royal Adelaide Show, and the Tour Down under have built a positive image of South Australia where they have a lot of media coverage and the economy has improved *Interview people who attend the Clipsal 500. ...read more.

Middle

This is true, I did more study on this and I found out that Clipsal 500 brings more people to Adelaide for the next 7 years. This information was done through the tourism SA website and I also found that the income that Adelaide receives is $26 million dollars. When I asked ten people "is the Clipsal 500 value for money" all the people responded by answering ok or excellent. Through this I can see that everybody overall enjoyed Clipsal 500 regardless of the gender. * Research an operator involved with the Clipsal 500 I researched an operator who was involved with the Clipsal 500 and was working at VB tent. The VB tent's main business is selling beer. They are from the UK. They said they tried to use South Australian products and have had a stand at the Clipsal 500 before. They said it was the most important event in SA that they participate in. The VB tent usually employs 1500 people. 1000 of them are casual employees. It is very important to Australia economy. They expect to make less than $50 000 in overall incomes. ...read more.

Conclusion

For one month of the year, they are covered with advertisements all three together in a four-day spectacular. And, in the Clipsal 500, there were not many toilets for visitors. The Clipsal had a very limited amount of toilet facilities in the actual ground. Also, many people were uncomfortable because there were not many sitting places. < There weren't any chairs or sitting place in front of stage> <Management strategies for the Clipsal 500> Strategies Effectiveness Suggested improvements Shops There were many kinds of shops and enough. All the shops were very expensive. Maps There were enough maps in the Clipsal 500. It was not easy to find directions. Security --- They are very tough, so it might give people to unpleasant feeling. Noise It attracts people who participate events or people who is outside of the event. It annoys people who live near by event held area. Toilets --- There were not many toilets for visitors *Conclusion Through all of the information provided above, it is obvious to say that the Clipsal 500 was a magnificent special event held in South Australia on a one-off basis. Special events in the society are an integral part of cultural tourism. As special events open, all of the states in Australia can get advantages for our economy and also it will help the Australian market to improve. ...read more.

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