• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13

Migration Patterns

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

MIGRATION PATTERNS QingYing Sun 11MTL Contents 1. Introduction .................... 3 - Place & time - Hypotheses .................... 4 2. Methods .................... 5 - Migration Photo Exhibition 3. Results .................... 6+ 7 - Different countries - Maps - World .................... 8 - Detailed.................... 9 4. Conclusion .................... 11 - Proving or disproving Hypotheses 5. Evaluation ....................12 Bibliography ................. 13 Chapter 1 - INTRODUCTION: This is an investigation based on Migration and I am aimed to find out the most common and important reasons and patterns of Migration, all over the world including different kinds of migration basing myself on the the Migration Photo Exhibition of Sebastiao Salgado in ICS during the month of November, and therefore, this investigation should only be based on that source of information. Before going to see the exhibition, I've set out four Hypotheses: - Most migrants travel only short distances and with increasing distance their number decrease. (distance decay) I think that this statement is true because the most common type of migration is commuting, and billions of people do this everyday. Tourism has developed into more local-based lately, too because short distance traveling is faster, cheaper and often safer. - Long distance migration is more likely to be to large centers of industry and commerce. I partially agree with it because a large portion of long distance migration nowadays consist of people from ELDCs to EMDCs seeking higher living standards. - The major direction of migration is from rural to urban areas./Urban dwellers are less likely to move than those in rural areas. ...read more.

Middle

Type II Cases - Kabul to rural areas The civil war in the 80s forced many people in exodus to the areas surrounding the virtually destroyed city in order to survive such harsh situations. - Rwanda to Burundi Rwanda is a relatively small country in Africa and since 1994 many people migrated to Burundi, Tanzania and other neighboring countries because of the war between two different ethnic tribes: Hutu and Tutsis. Many people lived in shelters and survived with ONU's help. -Kosovo to Albania Because of the frequent wars in this area, thousands of people are forced to leave their country and seek asylum in the neighboring nations such as Albania until war is over. -Vietnam to Hong Kong to USA/Australia After the fall of Saigon more than 195000 Vietnamese arrived in Hong Kong on boat for temporary asylum, from which later on, 70,000 entered USA and 10,000 were accepted by Australia. These three cases are all international migrations caused by war or difficult political situations which force the people to fear for their lives and leave their homeland in seek for asylum in Neighboring countries, as Rwanda to Zaire, Kosovo to Albania and Vietnam to Hong Kong, although many Vietnamese have later on chosen to migrate further away. Type III Cases -Shanghai downtown to Surrounding areas Shanghai, as being one of the fastest growing Asian Mega cities, has undergone spectacular modernizations, during which process, has left many residents of Shanghai's old neighborhood homeless. ...read more.

Conclusion

They are: Illegal migration from Morocco or other African countries to Spain occur much more often during summer (warm weather) than winter (cold) because the illegal migrants travel by boat across the ocean and warm weather favors the journey, and risks of dying of cold is smaller. Also, in case the boat broke, it is relatively easier to swim in summer than in winter. Secondly there is the migration of villagers of Ecuador to larger cities seeking for jobs. The time they go away might depend on the harvest season, and other seasons of different jobs available in cities. Chapter 5 - EVALUATION: I think that this project has generally been fine since I've tried to find as much information as I could, to complete it. But I would like to make some improvements if I could do it again. Firstly, I would like to go through all parts of the Photo exhibition more thoroughly, because I had some difficulties finding out some destinations of migration flows. A defect about the exhibition itself is that although there are several types of migration present, I think that more examples of each type could be studied so comparisons can be made. I would suggest the following hypotheses for a further study of migration patterns: - All migrations from Rural to Urban areas are based on poverty and hunger. - Frequent international migrations will lead to a fast spread out of diseases. - Most migrations produce a compensatory counter-movement. - Females tend to migrate more than males within their country of birth, while males are much more likely to be involved in international migration. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Population & Settlement section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Population & Settlement essays

  1. Examples of Problems of ELDCs and how they are attempted to be solved

    Cairo, the capital of Egypt, is one of the largest, most urbanized cities in Africa. In fact, it is not only the most supreme in Africa, but also in the Middle East. Despite its desert location, Cairo has grown rapidly to reach more than 12 million inhabitants in 1994.

  2. Microclimates.My purpose of this study is to establish whether my hypotheses are true or ...

    Generally temperatures peak at night in urban areas, this is because dust and cloud act as a blanket to reduce radiation, in addition, buildings emit most of their stored up heat at night. The further away from urbanised areas temperatures decrease and reach a minimum in the countryside.

  1. Labor Migration - Politics and Governance

    The early 1990s was still plagued by lack of employment opportunities and financial instability for most workers. Migration to Hong Kong for two-year contractual domestic work then became very popular at that time. The volume of the departing workers was so immense that the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration had a pre-departure training solely for them (Tumbaga 1993).

  2. Describe and explain the causes, patterns and consequences of international migration

    Slave traders forcibly relocated as many as 20 million Africans to the Americas. Another example of forced migration occurs when governments compel certain populations to move to other parts of the country or to leave the country altogether. The oppressive Christian Inquisition, for example, forced Jews and Muslims to flee Spain in the 15th century.

  1. Math Portfolio: Radioactive Decay

    Result: 1 13-2=11 Year 15 7,6,4,5,5,4,8,2,3,5,7 Location Frequency of population 1 0 2 1 3 1 4 2 5 3 6 1 7 2 8 1 The graph would be: y= (1/2)^x Y=102.2436 When y=5, x will be 20.36568998 Where the line is the original formula and the dots are my prediction.

  2. An Overview of Immigration to Australia

    and Trade, February, 1998 2.5.1.1 Where today's Australians were born Australia 76.7% UK and Ireland 6.6% Continental Europe 6.4% Asia 5.0% Oceania 2.1% Middle East & North Africa 1.2% Other parts of the world 2.0% Figure 6. Where today's Australians were born Figure 6 shows Australians' countries of origin.

  1. Walk from the outer suburbs of Walsall, into the inner city, to see how ...

    6 The scores are out of 10, 1 being very poor, and 10 being excellent. The graph to show this data, is on pages In this table there are a few anomalies, which are actually examples are inner-city redevelopment. As I walked around Walsall's CBD, I took out a questionnaire,

  2. International Migration

    This is a dramatic increase since the mid-1970s when there were less than 3 million refugees worldwide. The end of the Cold War and the end of regimes that kept social order led to the dissolution of countries and changes in politics that led to unbridled persecution and a huge increase in the number of refugees.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work