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On Wednesday 16th October 1987, some of the strongest winds to ever have been recorded in England tore through the country leaving a path of destruction, devastation and demolition behind it.

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Introduction

On Wednesday 16th October 1987, some of the strongest winds to ever have been recorded in England tore through the country leaving a path of destruction, devastation and demolition behind it. Warnings of high winds had been issued two days before, but nobody foresaw such annihilation. This storm was the worst to hit South East England since 1703, and will be the worst for 100's of years yet to come. And the cause of this storm? A severe depression in the weather system. In basic terms, a depression is a low pressure weather system which bring periods of unsettled weather with them. ...read more.

Middle

15th Oct, 21:30, A warning of strong winds is given, they may reach up to 50 kmh. 16th Oct, 00:30, Radio shipping forecast warns of severe gale conditions for "sea area's" Thames, Dover, Wight, and Portland are particularly at risk. - 01:30, Police and Fire services are put on official alert: "Extreme weather conditions expected". - 05:30, Wind velocity of 90 kmh recorded at Heathrow Airport, in excess of 100 kmh on the south coast: roads and railroads blocked by fallen trees. - 08:00, Centre of the intense depression reaches North Sea, tearing across Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire to the Wash. Strongest winds in South East. ...read more.

Conclusion

750,000 trees were blown down on National Trust land alone. Mr Hanner, a local politician, says that he "feels for his community and it has been a horrific experience" He later said that trying to piece communities back together will be difficult when so much has been left for ruins. Another local citizen, who wished to remain nameless, said that "although it has caused such grief in the community, we should not dwell on it, we should be glad it is over and not unhappy it began" A philosophical view is perhaps what is needed to regain what has been lost. For some, this shall be easier than others, when grieving for those whom have been lost in this "evil and unforgiving storm". ...read more.

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