• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Referring to both pharmaceutical and tobacco companies, explain how transnational corporations can influence the health of people in countries at different stages of development.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Referring to both pharmaceutical and tobacco companies, explain how transnational corporations can influence the health of people in countries at different stages of development (15) Both pharmaceutical and tobacco companies can be transnational corporations and some wield enormous international power and influence covering over one hundred countries with billions of pounds worth of profit; in 2009, GlaxoSmithKline had a net income of approximately �6 billion! Some corporations have, for example, used their profits to help fight widespread diseases in less economically developed countries (LEDCs), such as GlaxoSmithKline's help in the fight against Lymphatic Filariasis in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Some have set up health programmes in more economically developed countries (MEDCs) to reduce common health problems in these areas, such as different types of cancer. However, some corporations only supply people with the means to deteriorate their health, such as some tobacco companies like British American Tobacco, especially in LEDCs, but both pharmaceutical & tobacco companies play an important role in the health of the world's people. A pharmaceutical company is a company, which develops, produces and markets drugs licenced for use as medications, so obviously these companies play a huge role in the health of people worldwide as they provide medication against diseases that would harm health. ...read more.

Middle

Tobacco companies feel much less of an obligation to help eradicate disease than pharmaceutical companies do and for that reason few tobacco companies have invested, at the expense of their profit, in health schemes to aid the disease-stricken in LEDCs. They are much more interested in securing a long-term community of consumers demanding their product. British American Tobacco (BAT) in Africa is a prime example of this capitalist, profit-driven attitude in LEDCs. In Malawi, BAT advocated the sale of single cigarette sticks, which were very popular with children as they were so cheap; a single cigarette costs one fifth of the price of a single biscuit, which at least has some nutritional value. BAT used a "single-stick" campaign to try and encourage as many young people as possible to start smoking as they knew that once they had tried a few they would eventually become addicted to their product, which is wondrous news for their profit, as their body tells them that they 'need' a cigarette and so they buy more of their product and for this reason, 80 000 to 100 000 children start smoking worldwide every day. ...read more.

Conclusion

Due to MEDCs' laws, tobacco companies must provide some level of healthcare and so in that instance they help better the health of their employees, but again they do little to help with international health problems as they are more concerned with their profit. In conclusion, both tobacco and pharmaceutical companies have great influence on the health of people in countries at different stages of development, whether they be an MEDC or an LEDC. Producing drugs and medicines and health aid provided by pharmaceutical companies are probably the largest positive influences either of these types of companies have on the health of populations. Pharmaceutical companies are generally positively influencing the health of people in countries at different stages of development, but in different ways either by providing aid or employment or through the capitalist nature of the industry they are in. Whereas tobacco companies are trying to maintain a large consumer pool for their product, whilst adversely affecting people's health due to the carcinogenic nature of tobacco and cigarette products and are therefore negatively influencing the health of people in almost exactly the same way in countries of all stages of development. As tobacco companies have less social and moral responsibility they are not motivated to help in the fight against widespread diseases, like the pharmaceutical companies are. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

An outstanding analysis and evaluation of the role of tobacco and pharmaceutical TNCs in countries at different levels of development. The only thing that would improve this is referencing the information used.
5 Stars

Marked by teacher Molly Reynolds 07/08/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition essays

  1. The Development of the Travel and Tourism Industry and the Factors Affecting it Today

    Coach travel dropped from 28 per cent in 1951 to 9 per cent in 1990. The growth in car ownership in the UK has led to an increase in associated environmental problems, including pollution, congestion and the loss of land to further road building.

  2. Consider the Defining Features of Dependency Theory and distinguish its Major Variants. Discuss the ...

    Therefore, peripheral industrialisation is based on products which in the centre are mass consumed, but which are typically luxurious consumption in dependent economies. Industrialisation in dependent economies enhances income concentration as it increases sharp differences in productivity without generalising this trend to the whole of the economy.

  1. The pros and cons of an increased tourism industry

    In Mosisch and Arthington's ( 1998 in Newsome et al.2002) study of the impacts of power boating on lakes and reservoirs, they reported that between 380 and 600 million litres of outboard motor fuel are discharged into waters each year.

  2. Tourism can lead to a multiplier effect. What is meant by the term multiplier ...

    During their stay the tourists will require entertainment, an opportunity to sample the local food and possibly see the sights the area has to offer by taking a guided tour or coach tour of the surroundings, all of which require people (hopefully local to avoid leakage of revenue back to MEDCs)

  1. What are the factors that led to contemporary differences in development between countries?

    South Korea also encouraged large TNCs to settle in the company and they helped develop it as they provide employment for the masses and usually assist by providing housing and healthcare for their employees . Politics good or bad is very important in the development or lack of development in

  2. No Development without Security, No Security without Development Discuss this statement.

    This is has been mainly due to the fact that educational and career opportunities were non-existent, before 1980, and it was seen that women should stay at home which has dramatically influenced the demographic and economic situation of the country.

  1. How energy secure are we in the UK?

    This rate of production was able to meet the UK average consumption levels, which is 1.74 million barrels per day. This suggests the UK was energy secure, because it had a readily available supply of energy that was reliable for that year.

  2. Examine the role TNCs play in the growth of globalization.

    contributes to globalisation and an example is Tesco, through its global expansion it has stores in 11 countries, such as Thailand, Poland, Turkey and the UK. Showing how one company has spread into multiple countries, encouraging economic growth and employment around the globe, this encourages skilled people to work in

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work