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Sustainable development

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Introduction

Outline the concept of sustainable development (5) Sustainable development involves "meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." (World Commission on Environment and Development). Sustainable development is the way in which developing undergoing industrialisation will avoid becoming industrialised carbon intensive nations with a high level of emissions, much like current industrialised countries. Sustainable development can be achieved through planning of urban dwelling for example inner city terrace housing is more energy efficient than rural detached housing as they have less exterior walls. It can also be achieved through government policy for example within the EU the law requires that an Environmental Impact Assessment is carried out for all large scale civil engineering projects eg. motorways. Discuss the view that rapid economic growth is unsustainable (20) Rapid economic growth often is unsustainable as it does not meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The excessive consumption of natural resources and the environmental and social impacts are felt throughout countries that have experienced rapid economic growth. ...read more.

Middle

Efforts to combat the problem have been ineffective for example the Environmental Protection Agency have not been able to help the situation. The government and the business owners have a lack of interest in halting the pollution and degradation as they want to maintain the economic growth already experienced. A slow growth policy, a stop to high pollution industries, and environmental control and clean up has been recommended as a solution to the problems. This will hopefully help Taiwan to grow sustainably but still maintain economic growth. The United Nations has warned the booming economic growth in Asia and the Pacific is placing unsustainable pressure on their environments and new approaches beyond pollution control are needed. Chung states the current rapid growth in the region is not sustainable. A policy of 'grow first, clean up later' has been adopted in these countries which are leading to unsustainable growth. Despite Asia's rates of industrial production exceeding global averages over the past decade, the region's rates of population growth, poverty, urbanization, and use of land and water resources have also been higher. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Philippine government have since made and passed laws and regulations that challenge the environmental problems as well as keeping the 'goals' of sustainable development. After the Earth summit in Rio de Janeiro the Philippines created the Philippine Commission on Sustainable Development (PCSD), the first national council for sustainable development in Asia. The Medium Term Philippine Development plan or Philippines 2000 was a strategy plan to reduce poverty and attain economic growth by opening up the country to foreign investment and removing regulations on businesses. In conclusion, rapid economic growth is often unsustainable and it is only lately that governments have realised the importance of sustainable development and have introduced development regulations and laws to commit to sustainable growth. However, as the Philippines show this is possible without disruption to the economic growth. If the global economy continues to grow by 3 % a year for the next 50 years, the total global GDP will more than quadruple. Whether such a drastic increase in economic activity will be compatible with the requirements of environmental and social sustainability will depend on the "quality of growth," and the balancing with social and environmental factors. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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