• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Technological Leapfrogging. Examine the Importance of Technological Leapfrogging for Developing Countries

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Examine the Importance of Technological Leapfrogging for Developing Countries (15 marks) Technological leapfrogging is the providing of a quick or short-cut route to the most appropriate technology. There is a clear gap between the developed world and the developing world in terms of a digital divide. The digital divide is any inequalities between groups in terms of access to information and communication technologies. An example of successful technological leapfrogging comes from India, which decided to leapfrog the technology of landlines to mobiles. In 1998 there were 22 landline telephones per one thousand people, due to landlines being expensive and wait for installation was an unacceptable few years. ...read more.

Middle

They have allowed from the an increase in income, with the growing middle class benefitting from outsourced jobs in IT & call centres. Mobile phones have the potential to narrow the digital divide by providing the poor in India with access to the information they need in order to maximise their economic outputs and minimise their risks. Mobile phones have also been helpful in Afghanistan, allowing communication to remote locations, where it is hard to put in landlines due to the physical restraints Afghanistan is particularly difficult to prove infrastructure of technology due to wars and civil unrest of which it experiences, so by the use of mobile phones the country has been able to start increase trade. ...read more.

Conclusion

Ethanol fuel has been produced from sugarcane for transportation, replacing petrol and providing an alternative approach to business-as-usual development. China has also developed solar cities, for example Rizhao, where in 2007 99% of households in central districts used solar water heaters from photovoltaic's for hot water, reducing the carbon footprint. Overall, technological leapfrogging allows developing countries to increase their accessibility, communication and knowledge, therefore increasing their development rates. This is especially demonstrated by China's vast growth over the last few years, by its embracing of solar technologies. If developing countries begin using alternative greener technologies, such as Brazil and Ethanol fuel, then they can create a more sustainable future. ?? ?? ?? ?? Essay: Technological Leapfrogging Mr Bouquet Charlotte Higgins ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition essays

  1. Assess the extent to which Trans National Corporations (TNCs) have a positive impact ...

    local businesses then more money is drawn towards itself, as more and more local people will rely on it. TNC's are becoming increasingly environmentally aware as they have a global corporate image to uphold therefore they are trying hard to improve, and lessen their bad effects on the environment which in the past were seen as okay.

  2. Discuss the alternative methods that developing countries might use to overcome the difficulties that ...

    devote resources, which could have been used to increase productive potential to provide hospitals and schools to cater for children. Many Multi-National Companies (MNC's) invest in developing countries to take advantage of the cheap land and labour. This investment might be argued as a positive impact on the country but

  1. Can developing countries ever catch up with developed countries

    building of an effective centralized national state"7, plus the rise of political democracy and modern science. Once these pre conditions have been meet take-off will happen, with early massive profits for business people eventually stimulating general wellbeing. Modernisation theorists would argue that evidence to suggest this theory works can be easily be identified.

  2. Core and periphery of Brazil

    Young and ambitious workers often leave the periphery to move the core, where there are greater job opportunities. This adds to the problems that the periphery faces, with a reduced work force and an aging population. The North has never been prosperous and has always been thinly populated.

  1. For two Economic Models, briefly describe the Model, and carefully compare and contrast their ...

    This is the theory by which, as the population increases, more land comes into production, and as this is less fertile, so the production per area falls in comparison to the previous production cycle. It is also assumed that there is a labour surplus.

  2. Current development issues in Brazil

    is expected to increase from $8.1 billion in 2000 to $18.5 billion by 2010.8 Yet it is important to focus on environmentally friendly technologies and accommodation for visitors in order to fully capitalize on the potential of ecotourism. Environmental threats facing Brazil(Table 1, Annex 1 summarizes the major environmental threats in Brazil.)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work