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The Aging Population of Japan

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Introduction

The Aging Population of Japan Japan is the "oldest" Nation in the world. The percentage of the population above 65 years is 19.7%, which is 25.2 million Japanese. This is higher than most of the other aging countries such as Italy 19.6%, Germany 18.6%, and France 16.3%. This percentage has increased drastically since 1950 when it was 4.9% and it is expected to reach 36.5% by 2050. This obviously have a huge impact on the over all dependency ratio.1 The average life expectancy in Japan is 81.6 (77.9 for males and for 85.1 for females). In 2002 Japan was recorded to have the highest life expectancy compared to other developed countries such as USA, 77.1 and Switzerland 79.1. Japan, a country which had a life expectancy below most developed countries in the 1950, 63.9, (partly due to World War II) has made advances in medical technology and improvements in sanitation. The increase in recent years is also due the fact that there haven't been any major outbreaks of flu or other infectious diseases. Japan's life expectancy is expected to increase to 88.1 by the year 2050. ...read more.

Middle

This is a national average; some regions in Japan will have a low aging population whereas others will have a high aging population. It has also been projected that by 2025 there will be communities where 80%+ of the population is 65 and over. This is also reflected in the median age of Japan's population is relatively high compared to other countries, 42.8. This obviously has an affect on the dependency ratio. Right now the elderly dependency ration alone (child dependency ratio is with children under 15) is about 30%. That would mean three working age people would have to support one elder. This is projected to increase rapidly in the coming years. In 2050 demographers expect the dependency ratio to be three people from the working population to support two elderly people. Tax revenues will cause problems for the working population, which therefore create problems for the government because of its huge deficit. ..... There are several ways the government could control the aging population, although this would cost a lot. I think that the government should provide incentives for large families, two or more children so that the population should increase slowly and therefore increasing the youth population, raising fertility. ...read more.

Conclusion

15-64 (%) 65 or over (%) Japan 1950 59 8 68 22.3 35.4 59.6 4.9 Japan 1955 55 9 64 23.6 33.6 61.1 5.3 Japan 1960 47 9 56 25.5 30.2 64.1 5.7 Japan 1965 38 9 47 27.3 25.9 67.8 6.2 Japan 1970 35 10 45 29 24 68.9 7.1 Japan 1975 36 12 47 30.4 24.3 67.8 7.9 Japan 1980 35 13 48 32.6 23.6 67.4 9 Japan 1985 32 15 47 35.2 21.5 68.2 10.3 Japan 1990 26 17 44 37.4 18.4 69.6 12 Japan 1995 23 21 44 39.7 16 69.5 14.6 Japan 2000 21 25 47 41.3 14.6 68.2 17.2 Japan 2005 21 30 51 42.8 14 66.3 19.7 Japan 2010 21 35 56 44.5 13.6 64 22.4 Japan 2015 21 43 64 46.2 13 61 26 Japan 2020 21 47 68 48.2 12.4 59.5 28.1 Japan 2025 20 50 70 50.2 11.9 58.9 29.2 Japan 2030 20 53 73 51.7 11.8 57.8 30.4 Japan 2035 22 57 79 52.7 12.1 55.9 31.9 Japan 2040 24 65 89 53.3 12.6 53 34.4 Japan 2045 25 70 95 53.3 12.9 51.2 35.9 Japan 2050 26 72 98 53.2 13 50.4 36.5 1 http://esa.un.org/unpp/index.asp?panel=2 (2005) 2 http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/japan/socsec/ogawa.html 3 http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/japan/socsec/ogawa.html Pictures- http://www.hino.meisei-u.ac.jp/econ/fnet/indexi.html ...read more.

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