• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19

The characteristics of the Horsbere Brook vary along it length.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The characteristics of the Horsbere Brook vary along it length. Introduction We followed the Horsbere Brook from its source in Buckholt Woods) to its confluence with the River Severn. We went to six places. They are Birdlip, Brockworth, Buckholt Woods, Innsworth, Hucclecote and Sandhurst. All these places are in the Cotswold Hills. The Cotswold Hills is made up of limestone, clay, chalk, sand and clays. As I work through my coursework, I will try and answer the following questions below and I will also think about them as I go along my coursework. 1) Does the depth of the River change from source to confluence? 2) Does the width of the River change from source to confluence? 3) Does the velocity of the River change from source to confluence? 4) Does the bedload of the River become smaller in size from the source to confluence? Picture of Meander: (Meander spotted at site ) Meander - When rivers flow over a flatter land, they develop large bends called meanders. As a river goes around a bend most of the water is pushed towards the outside causing increased erosion. Attrition - Material is moved along the bed of a river, it collides with other materials and breaks up into smaller pieces. Corrasion - Fine material rubs against the river bank. The bank is worn away by a sand-papering action called abrasion and collapses. Hydraulic action - The sheer force of the water hitting the banks of a river. Traction - Large rocks and boulders are rolled along the bed of the river. ...read more.

Middle

On the right side of the stream, the pebbles length was around 7cm. The width of the pebbles was around the same on the left and middle side of the stream of 5cm. On the right side of the stream the width was around 6cm. Most of the pebbles were angular but on the left side the pebbles were more sub-rounded. The fourth site we visited was Hucclecote. The environmental quality index had a high mark and the litter and human impact which tell us that there were no traces of litter to be seen. The variety of vegetation was good but not brilliant but there was a lot of it. Hucclecote received the total mark of 27/35. I took a cross section recording at Hucclecote and I found the depth of the river which was 67cm and the width was 400cm. The above recording of the depth was from the middle of the river at 170cm. I also did a bedload grab sample and found that most of the stones by the river were sub-rounded and the width of the stones were around 3.5cm and the length was around 5cm. I took the velocity at Hucclecote and the results indicate to me that the river was flowing quite fast. Overall it took about 30 seconds for the dog biscuit to travel 10 metres. This was the fastest recording from the four sites where velocity was taken place. The land use at Hucclecote was mainly fields and woods. There were also quite a lot of buildings spotted with roads cutting through the streets. ...read more.

Conclusion

2) Does the width of the river change from source to confluence? - Yes, the width of the river does change as again, we were not able to measure the width of the river at the sixth site as it was too wide. 3) Does the velocity of the river change from source to confluence? - No, the velocity does not change from source to confluence as it was around 40 at site two and also around 4o at site five. This shows that the velocity hardly changed at site two, three, four and five. 4) Does the bedload of the river become smaller in size from the source to confluence? - Yes, the bedload of the river became smaller in size from the source to confluence as at site two the length was around 8cm and the width 6cm and at site four the length was around 5cm and width 4cm. I have answered these questions from the information I gathered from my coursework. Evaluation I am now commenting on my coursework. The methods were primary and secondary data. I used simple methods to carry out my tasks for the coursework. We did not have complicated equipment just rulers and dog biscuits. On the whole I think the equipment which was used worked out well for my coursework. The results I have were fairly accurate. We could have improved the results by carrying out each task several times but due to the lack of time we had to carry out each task we could not do so and also by using more accurate equipment. I feel that the conclusions I have made are correct and the details in my coursework show this. 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology essays

  1. 'To what extent does the River Lyn conform to the Bradshaw model of River ...

    out the Rs you use the calculation: 1-{(6?d2)�(n3-n)} With my data the sum will be 1-{(6 x 6)�125-5}} = 0.7 I looked up the Rs value in the significance table the published value from the significance table at the 5% level for five pairs of data is one.

  2. Study the downstream changes of Loughton Brook.

    The river has more energy due to the large amount of water and so erodes the river. During the later stages of a river there is more horizontal or lateral erosion rather than vertical erosion. Corrasion will also occur and will widen the channel.

  1. I am going to study the characteristics of rivers and how they change as ...

    Most of the pebbles have a low sphericity. The pebbles have not been worn out a lot because the velocity of the river is not fast and so attrition cannot take place easily. If the velocity of the river had been fast, the pebbles would have been smaller and they would be more rounded.

  2. How does the Efficiency and Cross-Sectional Area of a River Change Down Stream?

    As can be seen in fig. 6 (see page 8) the cross-sectional area increases down stream, although there may have been some human impacts due to the large change between site three and four. However, there is still an increase in cross-sectional area.

  1. Edexcel Geography B Unit 3 Coursework

    However, velocity failed to increase beyond site 5 whereas depth gradually increased towards the end of the River Holford's course. 6 The values and pattern of the hydraulic radius was very similar to that of the average depth. The value of the hydraulic radius depends on the depth as this

  2. GEOGRAPHY COURSEWORK

    Stop 4 G.R.-514 803 At this stop there is a land slip at the side of the river which makes rocky beds. The V-shaped valley is also less steep but the river is wider than previous stops. Heather is not as abundant as previous stops and there is no Mountain Ash trees.

  1. Geography Coursework: Epping Forest

    The main forms of vegetation were trees. The river channel was relatively straight and the water was clear. There was not much water in the river at this site because the water level increases only after rainfall because the Loughton Brook is a flashy river so the water quickly flows away.

  2. Investigate how the velocity of rivers changes.

    due to the banks and manmade reinforcements as well as the bed causing more friction at the banks of the river and therefore a lower velocity and shallower depth as the river does not have sufficient energy to cause the particles at the bed of the river to erode downwards

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work