• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The controversy and the future of Common Agricultural Policy of European Union

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The controversy and the future of Common Agricultural Policy of European Union Problems/benefits Effect of enlargement Agriculture is a problematic area in every developed country. Free market economy that allows direct competition of agricultural products can often cause a surplus or shortage of certain products, and quality changes. In order to ensure reliable supply of food member states of the European Union decided to cooperate and transferred the authority over agriculture policy to European level. Common Agricultural Policy was set in 1961 and its aims were to improve production and solve existing problems in agriculture all over EU member states. The previous successes of cooperation with coal and steel, and the fact that most states had difficulties to produce certain goods logically led to deeper cooperation in agriculture, and to CAP. ...read more.

Middle

The goals of policy defined in Maastricht Treaty, article 39: "(a) to increase agricultural productivity by promoting technical progress and by ensuring the rational development of agricultural production and the optimum utilization of the factors of production, in particular labor; (b) thus to ensure a fair standard of living for the agricultural community, in particular by increasing the individual earnings of persons engaged in agriculture; (c) to stabilize markets; (d) to assure the availability of supplies; (e) to ensure that supplies reach the consumers at reasonable prices." (TEU) Since its foundation CAP has improved the agriculture of Europe in a great sense, but critics would say that costs of the successes are considerably high for all. ...read more.

Conclusion

The growth of the efficiency of the labor can be noticed on the fact that: " In 1960 over 15 million people in the original six had worked on the land. In the mid-1970s the agricultural population of the enlarged EC was only 14 million, falling to 10 million by the mid-1980s" (Urwin, 187) Second goal of CAP is a social mission: to help the quality of life of the people in agriculture. This went little against the economic productivity and caused many negative consequences on it, especially by huge costs. The interventions that were made were not only subsidizing the farmers, that is a huge burden for EU budget but artificial manipulations with prices and setting of standards. These two were criticized by many liberal economists as standardization brought prices up, and artificial price setting caused surpluses and deficits. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Production - Location & Change section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Production - Location & Change essays

  1. Opportunities in the big emerging markets (BEMs) such as India, Brazil and China.

    accept null hypothesis The top 10 industries 0.301392 0.564 (n=10, ?=0.05) accept null hypothesis The top 15 industries 0.135172 0.441 (n=15, ?=0.05) accept null hypothesis The top 20 industries 0.293619 0.377 (n=20, ?=0.05) accept null hypothesis The top 21 industries 0.33286 0.368 (n=21, ?=0.05)

  2. The Role and Importance of Agriculture In the Carribean. Organisations involved in its ...

    materials Importance understanding the Soil Profile * Soil horizons help to determine the soil type. * Most plant nutrients are present in the top soil, which can be used to determine the soil fertility. * Subsoil compactness will give a hint to the drainage of the soil.

  1. How successful was Stalin's attempt to industrialise the Soviet Union?

    it rose to great levels during 1939 and thereafter as the war came closer. Overall, between 1928 and 1941 there was an increase of 400% in iron and steel production and 600% increase in coal production. New areas of heavy industry were identified and developed east of the Urals, which were the most important of the new Soviet industries.

  2. Why have agricultural surpluses become a feature of many countries in the developed world ...

    This meant that farming became more intensified which government support and the EU's CAP helped. This intensification is the main cause of why agricultural surpluses have become a regular feature in many developed countries. To what extent have the benefits derived from such surpluses been outweighed by the costs?

  1. Define the term agricultural productivity and describe how it varies between different parts of ...

    These are all necessary in the creation of an efficient farm which would then lead to one with high agricultural productivity. Places with good conditions for agriculture are likely to have a greater agricultural productivity, therefore there are bands running around the world roughly following the biomes which indicate the amount of productivity.

  2. Major innovations in agriculture have always proved to be controversial. With reference to recent ...

    Genetically modified foods are a result of DNA technology which manipulates the genetic combinants of crops by inserting genes of other crops or organisms into the original crop o create new advantageous characteristics. Genetic modifications offer a way to quickly improve crop characteristics such as yield, pest resistance, or herbicide tolerance, often to a degree not possible with traditional methods.

  1. To what extent did the 'collective' farms of Eastern Europe work?

    The Nation that had the smallest percentage of agriculture actively involved in the cooperative scheme has experienced the highest percentage growth rate. This indicates to me that the Polish nation and its peasantry were more efficient and productive while farms were managed autonomously in the private sector.

  2. "Can the theories that Alfred D. Chandler developed in his book 'Scale and Scope: ...

    Another implication of this fact is that a thorough investigation each of these countries, as it is done by Chandler, would by far exceed the scope of this paper. As a consequence, the paper will treat in depth the industries and firms of only one country in more detail, those of Germany.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work