• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The environmental problems associated with using agricultural chemicals

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The environmental problems associated with using agricultural chemicals The use of chemicals such as fertilisers and pesticides in agricultural farming have advantages in that they increase the yield of crops and control the level of pests; however they also can have a damaging effect to the environment. Eutrophication is a process which damages the life in water environments and although it is a natural process, the use of fertilisers has aggravated the situation. Fertilisers contain the essential nutrients needed to be taken up by the plants for their optimum growth, mainly nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. These nutrients applied to the soil are mainly taken up by the plants they are intended for, but some are drained away through the soil called leaching, and end up in rivers and lakes, which has a damaging effect to the life. Nitrogen is most easily leached through the soil whereas Phosphorus binds quickly with soil minerals and Potassium is taken up very quickly by the plant roots. (1) The deposition of nitrogen onto soil can be very large, for instance annually 100 kilograms per hectare is deposited onto forest soil in the Netherlands. ...read more.

Middle

In some areas of Britain research has shown that rivers contain in excess of the recommended 11.3mg 1� � of nitrates, and this figure was set according to health risks from nitrate pollution. (2) This shows that nitrate pollution is a serious issue. From a source by Dix in 1981 it was shown that water draining from cropland can contain 10-15mg 1� � of nitrate, on average from a year's discharge being studied. (2) Although it is largely from the result of using fertilisers, it is also from point sources of human sewage and urban industrial waste. In Lake Wisconsin studied by Hasler in 1974, it was shown that 24.5% of the nitrogen came from treatment factories alone, compared to 53.8% from rural sources, which includes manure use, cropland, pasture, forest land and groundwater. (3) This shows that the agricultural chemicals are clearly affecting the eutrophication, but that there are many other sources that pose a problem as well. Organic waste also contain chemicals, nutrients and pesticides in varying amounts from farmyard manure, fertilizer, the excreta from the livestock animals and soil nitrogen and can cause environmental problems when there is too much and it pollutes rivers from surface run-off. ...read more.

Conclusion

When larger animals such as birds eat the insect they have the chemical inside them and this can build up into concentrations capable of affecting the animals that they weren't intended for. In a study made by Rachel Carson in 1963, the threat of these chemicals is outlined. Wildlife, fish and domestic animals including man were shown to contain various amounts of DDT which was a commonly used insecticide, and the source was found to be through plant food and in the case of fish, absorbed through the water. High and toxic levels of this chemical were found in fish and is an example of biological concentration. (2) The problem of persistent chemicals has been addressed by most of such chemicals being taken out from the market and pesticides that break down quickly into harmless substances are encouraged for use. (6) A solution used in agricultural that deals with the many problems like fertiliser use and pesticides is a system called integrated crop management. The overall benefits through strategies of crop rotations, organic manures, soil sampling, and disease assessment of crops include a reduce in nitrate pollution and less chemicals being used. (4) This system is very beneficial to the environment. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Environmental Management section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Environmental Management essays

  1. 'What problems do urban planners face? How are they to be solved?

    The most prominent disadvantages to Ebenezer Howard's green belt idea has been devised to protect the interests of the 'bourgeois status quo' of those who already own property within the zone. This relates mostly to the control of property prices within the zone, as the high demand cannot be satisfied

  2. Environmental Problems.

    Nitrogen Oxide etc * Contaminated water can spread diseases such as Cholera etc * These factors reduce the quality of life and life expectancy, and cause serious health problems-restricted breathing and rapid increase of contracting cancer etc Solutions- see solutions in tackling water contamination/air pollution etc In conclusion, many problems

  1. Emerging Chemical Contaminants: The Case of Perfluorochemicals

    Other major manufacturers of the PFCs use the telomerisation process to derive its products. This process is used by DuPont to produce poly(tetrafluorethylene) or PTFE also know as Teflon and FTOHs. This method gives a well-defined product with fewer isomers (Simik 2005).

  2. A report concerning new business development in the local area, which is the Paddington ...

    This is why for example, when the Council attempted to regulate an economic activity, those affected will try to persuade the Council and the developers not to take actions that would negatively affect them. Yet for a pressure group to be successful the leader must convince its members that the costs of the development outweigh the benefits.

  1. Thailand Highways Management Project

    It is also interesting to notice that work component 2 - 4 begin at the latter period. All the work can be altered to begin at the earliest period since each work component is independent to one another. The work could not scattered around the second and third years.

  2. Do the benefits of using fertilisers for improving Plant productivity outweigh the implications To ...

    Fertilisers normally consist of macronutrients (the main nutrients in mass quantities) and micronutrients (e.g. copper, zinc etc), which are also found, in fertilisers but in smaller quantities because they are not so vitally needed by the plant. Nutrients normally are known as NKP mixtures because these are the symbols of the elements, which the plant mainly needs for maximum growth.

  1. Rachel Carson

    She wrote numerous pamphlets on environmental conservation, as well as introductions to radio broadcasts on undersea life for the agency. This job stint lasted until 1949. For three of those years, Crson worked as the chief editor for all of the U.S.

  2. Is Brent Dealing Adequately With Its Environmental Problems?

    North-Brent also contains North West London's two most attractive recreational areas', the 'Welsh Harp Reservoir' and the 'Fryent County Park' An Environment is the place and surroundings of where Animals, People, and Plants live. Brent is an Environment for people.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work