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The main point of this enquiry was to find out how landscapes and processes change in a river valley. To see how rivers change as they flow downstream.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Geography Field Enquiry. River Bollin. By Samantha Espin. 9A. The main point of this enquiry was to find out how landscapes and processes change in a river valley. To see how rivers change as they flow downstream. To collect the required data for this enquiry we went to the River Bollin, once at Mottram St. Andrews and again at Sutton. The River Bollin has its source in Macclesfield Forest. The River then flows in a northwesterly direction through Macclesfield, Prestbury, Wilmslow, and Hale and near Outhrington. The River Bollin continues into its lower course, where it meets the Manchester Ship Canal and the River Mersey. The two sections we studied are marked on the map above. Site 1 - Mottram St. Andrews. Site 2 - Sutton. The equipment we needed to carry out our field enquiry was - 1) 2 ranging poles. 2) 20m tape measure. 3) Metre rulers. 4) Several oranges. 5) 30 cm rulers. 6) Several stopwatches. At each site we measured the following - 1) Depth and width of the river channel. 2) Field sketches; birds eye view, upstream and downstream. 3) Bed load. 4) Speed of flow. The methods we used for each are as follows. 1) The depth and width of the river. ...read more.

Middle

Our Results from the River Bollin. Site 2 - Sutton. Nearest the Source. * Depth and width of river and river channel. Channel - 5.4 metres wide. River - 4.1 metres wide. Height of River Cliff - 0.6 metres. LEFT. 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 RIGHT. Depth in cm. 5 10 10 18 13 13 1 4 Depth in cm. These figures allowed me to form the cross section below - * Field Sketches. These are my field sketches - * Bed Load. We measured 10 stones from the riverbed. These are the results. Stone. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average. Length. 19 8 17 6.5 16 10.5 10 6.6 13.5 9 11.6 Width. 17 6.5 7 6.1 7 6.5 7 6 9 5 7.7 Height. 3 1 6 3 8 6 3 2 4 3 3.9 Here is a stone, drawn using the average measurements from the 10 stones. * Speed of Flow. Here are our results. Group 1. Group 2. Group 3. Average. Orange 1. 29.22 secs 33 secs 35.14 secs 32.45 secs Orange 2. 40.15 secs 38.7 secs 33.15 secs 37.33 secs TOTAL AVERAGE = 34.89 secs Speed = Distance/Time = 20 metres/34.89 secs = 0.57 metres per second. ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion. From my study of the different sections of the River Bollin, I found that river landscapes and processes do change as the river moves downstream. The main changes were the width and depth of the river, the speed of flow and the size of the bed load. This investigation gave me a greater, more in-depth knowledge and understanding of river formations and processes. I also learned how important it is to listen to instructions. Also to take accurate measurements and to do an activity more than once to get an average. We had some difficulty collecting the depth data from Site 1. The river had risen by 30 centimetres because of recent rainfall, so it was too dangerous for Miss Longman to get into the river and collect the data. The investigation would have been made clearer if we had gone to the sites in the opposite order. Sutton, near the source first and then Mottram St. Andrews, further downstream second. This would have lessened any chances of confusion. It would improve my knowledge further, to do some further study of sites further down the river, nearer to the mouth, so we could do some further comparisons. Overall, the investigation went well and we acquired all of the data we needed, even though my feet did get wet!! ...read more.

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