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This project is about the farming in the Bahamas. Areas we are going to cover are agriculture, subsistence farming in Bahamas, marketing of local crops, and also the result and effects of poor agricultural practices

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Introduction

Introduction Farming in the Bahamas This project is about the farming in the Bahamas. Areas we are going to cover are agriculture, subsistence farming in Bahamas, marketing of local crops, and also the result and effects of poor agricultural practices. There are other areas I am going to cover as you will see. Define Agriculture Agriculture is the practice of cultivating the land or raising stock. It is also the process of producing food, seeds, fiber and desired products by the cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). The practice of agriculture is also known as farming, all methods of production and management of livestock, crops, vegetation, and soil can be done in farming. Describe local methods of subsistence farming in The Bahamas, that is crop and animal farming in the major islands. Subsistence farming is farming on a small scale, mainly to meet family's needs. This type of farming produces enough food staple items to feed the farmer's family with some remaining for sale. Some animals that are raised by subsistence farmers are chickens, goats, and pigs. Plants grown by these farmers are tomatoes, peppers, pigeon peas, limes, bananas etc. There are two types of methods used in subsistence farming and they are the slash and burn technique and pothole farming. Slash and Burn Method * Using cutlasses a diminutive area of dense natural vegetation is cleared. ...read more.

Middle

In the mid-80s 75% of the marketing of fruits and vegetables was handled by the produce exchange. By the mid-90s the figure was down to about 40% or less. The reasons for this could be: long delays in payment; prompt payment by non-governmental marketing agencies; and more competitive prices offered. However the Produce Exchange does provide easier access to the capital for the drier islands that produce food staples. Direct Sales Marketing Farmers and wholesalers enter into direct sales arrangements wherein a farmer's produce is shipped to Nassau, and the purchasing company collects the items at the dock. The payment is prompt and competitive prices are offered. Farmers' Market At a Farmers' Market local farmers sell their produce directly to the local customers. In most cases the produce sold is a result of subsistence farming. Commercial farmer may send produce to the Farmers' market that has been rejected by the packinghouses or produce exchange. PackingHouses - A number of packinghouses have been established at strategic locations on the producing islands. At the packing house farm produce is processed, graded, packaged, stored and presented. * Processed - produce is washed and cleaned. * Graded - produce is divided according to the eminence of the product. * Packed - processed and graded produce is bagged or placed in boxes. * Storage - the produce is refrigerated if necessary or placed where the chance of spoilage is reduced. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another modern technology we use for food production is the Herbicide. The herbicides are used to eliminate plants or crops that are unnecessary in the farmer's farmland. That way you would have live crops growing. Farmers also use pesticides. Pesticides are used to prevent, destroy, or mitigate or relieve of any pest in the crops. Discuss the undesirable effects of deforestation and the overuse of fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. * Deforestation presents multiple societal and environmental problems. The immediate and long-term consequences of global deforestation are almost certain to jeopardize life on Earth, as we know it. Some of these consequences includes: loss of bio-diversity; the destruction of forest-based-societies; and climatic disruption. * Fertilizer nitrogen, usually nitrate nitrogen, is very soluble. The water table in most of the Bahamas is close to the soil surface. Therefore, from the misuse of fertilizer, dissolves nitrogen can leach into underground streams which can cause pollution. * Through the continued used of pesticides, there is a chance of pesticides residues getting into food for human and animal consumption. The bio-magnification of a chemical as it goes through the food chain is a subtle way of man and livestock being affected by pesticides or heavy metals, which may cause damage or cause cell abnormalities in our bodies. * Some herbicides use to control weeds are very stable. These stable chemicals last a long time in the soil, which limits the grower's use of land. Where safety is concerned, through the misuse of chemicals, problems such as severe headaches, respiratory disorders, blood poisoning, infertility and even maybe death. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

A good but rather general overview of agriculture in the Bahamas. It would benefit from specific examples from within the Bahamas along with maps locating these examples as well as referencing key information.
3 Stars.

Marked by teacher Molly Reynolds 07/08/2013

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