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To investigate the effects of coastal management, and to investigate the effects of longshore drift.

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Introduction

Year 11 G.C.S.E Geography Coursework (Umar Sheikh 11GS) Aim: 1. To investigate the effects of coastal management. 2. To investigate the effects of longshore drift. Introduction This coursework is on the fieldtrip to Somerset, Nettlecombe to investigate the effects of coastal management and longshore drift. Porlock Bay is in the south west of England just below Wales. This course work is mainly on the coastal processes and management which deals with the protection of land from the sea. As we went to Somerset we did field work to collect data on longshore drift to investigate its effects. We explored longshore drift along the coastline of Porlock Bay in Somerset. Coastal management is important in this area because of longshore drift. Longshore drift is transport along the coast when waves move material across a beach; we will go over longshore drift in more detail later. Longshore drift causes one part of a coastline to gain more of beach by deposition. Deposition is the dumping of material. Longshore drift is caused by waves. In response to LSD they have built groynes, sea walls and boulder barriers which are all types of sea defence. ...read more.

Middle

I expect the beach at Gore Pt to be small and the beach at Hurlestone Pt to be big as Longshore drift keeps moving the deposition to Hurlestone Pt so the beach is were the transportation is dumping the deposition every day so it will get big. From the collection of data from the beach we have to create a beach profile. An example of a beach profile is shown below: A cross section of a beach-beach profile. Method Equipment we used: - Pebbleometer - Powers index - 30m tape - Clinometer - Ranging pole Our day has come to collect data for our investigations on longshore drift. We firstly arrived at Gore Pt and got into small groups of 3 with exceptions of 4. We firstly measured the angle of the first facet using a clinometer. When we arrived at Gore Pt we were told that the smallest person in the group was going to use the clinometer so we could get an accurate angle. For this to happen the smallest person in the group has to point it at the tallest person in the group and we point it up or down the tallest person so were ever the 0 comes on the person say for example the forehead we have to remember that. ...read more.

Conclusion

The pebbles would have been eroded with no doubt leaving them in the "round" groups. Conclusion I have found a series of results regarding the pebbles. From the results and analysis I have come to a conclusion that my hypothesis was indeed right. My hypotheses stated that the pebbles at Gore Pt will be angular and round at Hurlestone Pt. I have found out that there is longshore drift occurring in Porlock bay. The pebbles have indeed eroded along the way. The pie charts have clearly shown that erosion has taken place as it shows differentials between the pebbles sizes. Evaluation The investigation went according to plan. There were many things we could have improved such as being very accurate in putting the pebbles in different sizes according to the powers index and we could have been more precise in measuring the a-axis of the pebbles. We could also have collected more to give us more precise, reliable results. The equipment could have been more accurate such as the tool used to measure the a-axis of the pebbles. To make the results more accurate we should of collected the pebbles at the same time at both Gore Pt and Hurlestone Pt to avoid tidal differences. However this could have had a minimum impact on our study as the time difference was relatively small. ...read more.

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