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Tonight's News - Main Headlines - News on 'Hurricane Michael'.

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Introduction

Tonight's News - Main Headlines. News on 'Hurricane Michael' 'Hurricane Michael' hit southern England in the early hours of yesterday morning. The storm developed rapidly that weather forecasters over England were unable to predict the track and intensity of the storm. As soon as the weather conditions were recognised severe warnings were given to emergency services. The storm during the early hours of yesterday & through to today was the worst & the most devastating to effect the south east of England since 1703. The storm has left damage to the countryside, cities & towns. The south east of England has suffered severe damage and ships have been driven on to shore. 18 people died as a direct result of the storm damage. ...read more.

Middle

Office blocks & flats have been reported to of come down. Many villages and towns were completely isolated by fallen trees An estimated total of �1.5 Billion for insurance claims. 15 Million trees have been lost. 150,000 telephones were cut off. Over 3 million households and businesses are still left without electricity. Most of south east of England are without power, until further notice. There has also been minor damage reported of chimney pots & stacks falling down, fences coming out of the ground, tiles coming off roofs of houses & many more electric cables have come down across roads & paths. Little notice was given of the storm because only high winds and heavy rain was forecasted for the end of the week, a depression was noticed in the early hour of the 15th but was expected to track along the English Channel. ...read more.

Conclusion

Further into earlier this morning wind speeds of 94Km per hour were recorded at Heathrow airport, in excess of 100Km per hour on the south coast. Centre of intense depression reached the North Sea; tracking across Buckinghamshire & Cambridgeshire to the Wash. Strongest winds in the south easterly area. 'Hurricane Michael' has been named after Michael Fish for his wrongly predicted weather forecast, but however correct in geographically correct terms of weather. Hurricanes form over very warm tropical waters, close to the equator. The storm, which we have just experienced - or depression - formed off the eastern seaboard of North America & came across the English Channel and is totally different in character - no matter how windy it got. We don't get hurricanes in this country - as Michael Fish pointed out yesterday. But we can get hurricane force winds. Anglian Weather News Sarah Gray. ...read more.

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