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We conducted the River study we did a number of things to make sure it was accurate. For example when we tested the velocity of the river we would measure the start and the finish distance, and ensure that all factors were kept the same

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Introduction

Introduction We visited the Highland Water River on the 13th of September. The River Highland Water site is located in the new forest, that last year became a national park. The location of the river is shown on map 1, where Ocknell Enclosure is the source. The New Forest is located in the South of England. It flows close to Lyndhurt and Brockenhurst, and is a short river with a total length of just 12 miles. Its mouth is in Lymington, and there it flows into Southampton Water, where it flows out into the English Channel. Site 1 is the Source of the River called Ocknell Plain. It is located in a marshy area, and is the furthest away from the nearest town (7 km). Its grid reference is . It was also the furthest to walk to, it was far away from built up areas, and we had to walk for half a mile to reach the area. Site 2 is closer to the main road, and (unlike source 1) it is within a few minutes walking distance. This site is within 4 km of Lyndhurst; it is more built up and developed here. Millyford Bridge's grid reference is . The Balmer Lawn (site 3) is located within 1 km of Brockenhurst. Here human influence is highest, and it is a far busier area, as it is situated next to a hotel so there are more people in the area. Equipment * Stop clock * Tape measure to measure the width of the river * Rulers to draw the tables, and measure the depth of the river * Dog biscuits to test the velocity of the river * Pencils and Pens to record the ...read more.

Middle

Site 1: Ocknell Plain Description: The above graph shows that the maximum depth of the river is 70cm, with a minimum of 55 cm. The river falls steeply at one side, which could be due to river cliffs being formed. The river has no water in it at the moment, which could be because there has been a lack of rainfall recently. Explanation: From looking at my graph I can see that there was no water in this section of the river. I can also tell that the river did not meander at this point. As it is not shallow at one side, and moreover it is no deeper, meaning that there will be no faster point of the river. The depth of the river also doesn't reach 0 cm until it reaches the edge, which shows that there are no river beaches/ point bars which are found on a meander. The graph also shows us that the river is not particularly deep, as the deepest part is 70cm, and the shallowest is 0cm. I believe that there was a very small amount of river in the river because it has either been a very dry summer, which would mean that much of the water had evaporated, and moreover there would have been limited rainfall, thus meaning that the rivers water would not have been refreshed. However there are signs of water being in the river, the picture shows that erosion has been occurring on one side of the river. On the other side a river beach has been formed, which is where the river has meandered with the faster water flowing on the outside and the slower water flowing on the inside, eventually stones are deposited by the slower water, and it dries up and forms a river beach. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example when we tested the velocity of the river we would measure the start and the finish distance, and ensure that all factors were kept the same to make sure of no anonymous results. We would also repeat the experiment 3 times, to make sure that we get the most accurate results possible. When we measured the width and depth to make it fair we would repeat the depth test, and record all results taken accurately in a table, which would make sure that it is not forgotten or changed. The only downside to collecting data was at site 1. This area had no water; so collecting the bedload was difficult, as it was hard to distinguish the river channels bedload from the stones that had gathered there from wind and human activity. This affected my results by making the bedload vary so greatly that it is hard to gain an accurate result. I believe that the bedload would have been smallest at stage one, as the river was not yet powerful enough to transport larger rocks. The other problems encountered were the fact that we only went to the site at one time of year. This meant that during other times of year the rivers characteristics would have varied greatly from that of summer. For example I believe that if we visited the site in winter then it would have water in, as in winter there tends to be higher rainfall, which means that the river channel would fill up. Moreover it tends to be colder, which means that the water will not evaporate and therefore the water will remain in the river for a longer period of time. ?? ?? ?? ?? Robert Hart Geography Mr Foden ...read more.

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