• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What are the advantages and disadvantages of an ageing population? What are the advantages and disadvantages of a youthful population? (Use a least one LEDC and one MEDC case study).

Extracts from this document...


Population Structure What are the advantages and disadvantages of an ageing population? What are the advantages and disadvantages of a youthful population? (Use a least one LEDC and one MEDC case study). The population structure of a country is often usually matched by its stage on the demographic transition model. LEDC's in stages 2-3 generally have very high birth rates and declining death rates. Their population pyramid has a wide base indicating a large youthful dependent population. In contrast MEDC's, in stages 4-5, have low birth and death rates and a rectangular shaped population 'pyramid', indicating a large elderly dependent population. There are many disadvantages of an ageing population. Britain within the last 50 years has seen the percentage of elderly people (65 and over) double to 17% of the population and this figure will continue to rise to nearly 25% by 2040 (15million people). As people age, they become more dependent on the care of others. Traditionally, this care was provided by the family, and was not a problem with relatively low life expectancy. Nowadays with many people living into their 80's and 90's, the need for care presents a burden which many families cannot cope with. ...read more.


It is often assumed that in developing countries, ageing proceeds faster in urban areas where fertility and mortality declines are typically more advanced than in rural settings. In reality, however, ageing in rural communities usually manifests itself earlier and advances more rapidly than in the cities. By far the most important determinant is rural-to-urban migration, which comprises mainly younger adults and thus increases the proportion of older persons 'left behind' in the villages. In some rural areas, ageing is further accelerated by factors such as the return of older persons, often upon retirement from the urban workforce, or the increased mortality among younger adults due to HIV/AIDS. Thus, in the majority of poorer countries, ageing is predominantly a rural phenomenon. An aging population means that there food supplies decrease in LEDC's leading to potential famines. This is because traditionally the younger people support the older generation and so they have less time to grow crops as well as a smaller workforce to produce the crops. Also an aging population will inhibit their development. However there are some beneficial consequences of an ageing population. Some manufacturing companies have tapped into the growing niche market for products such as wheelchairs and stair lifts. ...read more.


This therefore limits economic performance as shown by the very low GDP per capita of $540/capita. The rapid population growth causes problems such as exhaustion of resources, soil erosion, pollution, deforestation, lack of food supply, unemployment, income insecurity, overstretched health and educational service, lack of suitable housing and creation of squatter developments. A youthful population and rapid population growth rate should be dealt with for the country to develop. However to do this often drastic polices such as China's one child policy might be introduced. This can cause further problems such as female infanticide. Due to the high youthful population as much as 50% of the population live below the poverty line. However a youthful population can have advantages. In some countries economic development is stifled due to lack of human resource e.g. Singapore. Here the country has more than sufficient job opportunities and resources and in fact must get 40% of its labour force from abroad. To solve this problem and hence invest in its own economy Singapore is introducing polices to get a much larger youthful population. In India it is part of tradition to have many children because the subsistence way of life requires young, fit and mobile people to work the fields thus providing and supporting the elderly. Without the youthful population many elderly people would struggle to support themselves dying younger and lowering life expectancy. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Population & Settlement section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Population & Settlement essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Comparison Between MEDC and LEDC

    4 star(s)

    Finally asylum seekers usually move to MEDC due to conflict, war or violence in their own country. Due to LEDC have very little or no appealing assets they have a low migration rate. Over population and under population happen in both LEDC and MEDC but they cause different problems for each type of country.

  2. land use pattern

    I would have got much more accurate results and my results would have been much better, which could have helped me with my coursework. My results were not affected badly by any difficulties in collecting the data because I was still able to collect enough data for

  1. London Docklands Case Study.

    Businesses moved, and not many people were left. Counter-Urbanization was taking place. Then when the redevelopment started, the land was converted back from being a run-down town, to a good clean town which was rather attractive. It also became a multi functional place, where it attracted new industry such as newspapers, and banks.

  2. Geography revision - flooding - Urbanisation - Population problems

    is considered the 'City of Opportunity,' where one can earn more in a month than they could in a year in Mexico. Seasonal work (cotton, fruit, vegetable picking and processing.) Work is shorter hours and better paid. Other Mexican people and communities are a big incentive.

  1. India has many economic and natural advantages that should make it powerful in todays ...

    and blue (less than 1 million) states are coded mostly because of their lack of large cities or location, which determines the weather. For example, Jammu and Kashmir takes up a lot of space but has a very low population due to its extreme location, near the Himalayas.

  2. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the GMS poses a serious health problem with potentially disastrous ...

    In effect, HIV/AIDS tends to exacerbate existing development problems through its catalytic effects and systemic impact. 2. In areas heavily affected by HIV/AIDS, the catalytic effects and systemic impact of the epidemic on rural development may: a) amplify existing development problems to such an extent as to trigger structural changes (i.e.

  1. What are the consequences of an ageing population?

    Most MEDCs have a state pension system - people pay taxes to the government to guarantee they are provided with a pension when they retire. The more pensions needed however, the harder it is for the government to provide adequately for everyone.

  2. An ageing population can bring economic, political and social advantages as well as disadvantages. ...

    Also, an ageing population can bring political disadvantages. For example, due to the high amounts of elderly people requiring pensions and wanting to retire, the government may be under pressure to change the retirement ages. This is seen in the UK where it is now 65 for both men and women and is set to increase to 68.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work