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What factors contributed to the expansion of the Barnwell area from a small village in 1801 to a busy suburb of Cambridge by 1901?

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Introduction

Question: What factors contributed to the expansion of the Barnwell area from a small village in 1801 to a busy suburb of Cambridge by 1901? * At the end of the eighteenth century Cambridge was suffering a significative diminuish of the population. We can notice this by looking at the statistics provided. Meanwhile in 1674 the population exceeded 9000, by 1728 Cambridge's population was under 8000. There were many reasons that could explain this sudden fall in population. One of them was the problem of overcrowding, and the repercussions that overcrowding causes. Possible consequences of this factor could have been: poor hygenical conditions ( lack of clean water for everyone, or excessive amounts of sewage which were hard to get rid of), lack of employment places for everyone, and also very high prices on the property market. This latter problem is strictly related with the expansion issue in Cambridge, which we will explore further on. ...read more.

Middle

between the rich owners and the poor owners. The arrival of the Enclosure award had in a way slowed down the the fast rate at which the population was diminuishing. * The city of Cambridge had been various Ecclesiastical Parishes spread around throughout the town. Generally each area had its own Parish. During the century going from 1801 to 1901 we notice a fast rise in the population of certain Parishes, and especially the Parish of St. Andrew The Less, which was allocated in the Barnwell area (1 mile away from the city centre). The Enclosure Award in 1811, generally incremented the population of every Parish. The population gradually grew in certain Parishes, and although St. Andrew The Less had always seemed to grow at a faster rate than everother Parish, it wasn't only until 1845 and the following years that its population enourmously grew to reach a final peak of 27860 people. This population rise of this can be noticed when analysing the graph I developed. ...read more.

Conclusion

3 ( map of Cambridge during the middle ages), is situated next to the River Cam, close to the place where once the fortress of Castle Hill was built. The reason there was a rise in population in the Parishes next to the riverside, is because some people were conservative regarding their means of transport. Many people still retained the river the best mean of transport for trading their goods. Although travelling through the river was slow, now that most of the population had moved next to the Railway, it would have been much faster to travel. Also with the diminuishing of people making use of the River Cam for their trading business, the taxes on transport through the River had fallen. Generally, using th river as a mean of transport now, had two advantages: travelling became much faster, and also cheaper. This can be seen from fig. 4 ( The River Cam toll receipts). We notice that gradually, from 1845 the tolls fell to eventually reach the value of 367 � per annum. Having said this, the Railway still remained the most popular mean of transport. * ...read more.

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