• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is an environmental (natural) hazard?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

___________________________________________________________________ Assignment 1 Environmental Hazards and their Effects Collette Reynolds (Access to Teaching) ___________________________________________________________________ What is an environmental (natural) hazard? Environmental or natural hazards result from natural processes within the environment and they have the potential to affect people and property. These include: * Earthquakes * Volcanic eruption * Droughts * Floods * Severe weather e.g. hurricanes, tornadoes, etc.. The hazard event causes the actual damage to people and/or property. An environmental (natural) hazard only becomes a disaster when it affects people, hitting communities and disrupting normal, daily functioning. This causes deaths, physical damage to buildings and infrastructure, and long-term economic damage. Environmental hazards can be put into 3 main groups: * Climatic e.g. droughts, floods, heatwaves, hurricanes, tornadoes, etc. * Geomorphic e.g. earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, etc. * Biological - faunal and floral e.g. plant diseases, infestations, poisonous species, etc. In this assignment I will be concentrating on environmental hazards that relate to tectonic processes. Hazard events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are particularly problematic. What causes earthquakes and volcanic hazards? Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by tectonic processes. Tectonic processes have created major features such as mountain chains, volcanoes, ocean trenches, and so on. ...read more.

Middle

Better designed buildings 2. Disaster response plans 3. Forecasting technology 4. Community preparation 5. Awareness schemes in schools Poorer countries are not able to do this, therefore, what tends to happen is that they deal with the event after it has happened - more cure than prevention. Lack of emergency service provision in poorer countries means the death toll can be very high. For example, in 1985 a large earthquake hit Mexico City. Mexico is a very poor country and there was huge devastation leaving the country financially crippled. This could happen again in the future and, as it took a long time for the country to be rebuilt after 1985, the economy is still suffering. There are communities acting to prevent environmental hazards before they strike. It is seen as important to try and introduce a culture of awareness worldwide. There are two important stages are: 1. Disaster Reduction Reduction is long-term, including efforts to understand hazards, using good architects for better building design, forecasting and land zoning. 2. Disaster Preparation Preparation is shorter-term measures including evacuation plans and having food and medical supplies ready. Scientists are keen to play a key role in monitoring hazards, developing ways to understand hazard effects. ...read more.

Conclusion

The World Bank are working with ProVention to develop finance and insurance options that will help the very poor to protect their assets and livelihoods during times of disaster. Each activity aims to build on advantages and resources to achieve the goals identified as priorities. The results of these efforts can advance prevention efforts and help LEDCs build a more sustainable future. Can we deal with environmental hazards? Environmental hazards are natural processes so they cannot be stopped. Better understanding of such processes can help people to live with hazards but major hazard events seem to be much more powerful than people can deal with. It would seem that most disasters cannot be prevented but we can make a real difference worldwide by being prepared and having plans in place. Learning to live with environmental hazards is maybe the best option. Rich and poor countries are affected differently with poor countries often suffering a lot more. Many poor countries are less prepared often because of lack of money and lack of help from other countries. The divide between richer and poorer countries will only increase unless countries work together to share ideas and support each other. Financial support is important but it is not the only support needed. The work of ProVention could be very important and it should be developed more. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hazardous Environments section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hazardous Environments essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The number of fatalities that result from volcanic and seismic natural hazards is related ...

    4 star(s)

    Radon gas is measured as it will be released more quickly from granite and similar rocks when they are deformed by shifting. Ground water may rise independently of atmospheric conditions. Protection methods include; making buildings earthquake resistant; educating the public about disaster prevention; improving earthquake predication; implementing better evacuation plans and reducing the risk of fire.

  2. Free essay

    Discuss the view that poverty is the real killer in earthquake disasters

    3 star(s)

    In terms of modifying the loss LEDCs are heavily reliant on international aid, making them more vulnerable as aid rarely arrives straight away and lack of clean water and medication means disease can spread easily in the aftermath, killing many.

  1. Why do LEDC's Suffer Greater Damage From Earthquakes Than MEDC's

    This can be compared to the Kobe earthquake, where there were also many gas explosions and many fires. Long term effects of the earthquake were that the coffee supplies decreased, which meant that the coffee prices increased as there was a high demand.

  2. "Poor countries are more at risk from natural hazards than rich countries" How far ...

    notified and evacuated by local authorities, minimising the impact on human life. It was mostly property that was damaged and being an MEDC, it is easier to recover. Long-term and short-term impacts also have to be taken into consideration and can also be affected by the level of development.

  1. Discuss how a tectonic hazard can be viewed as purely physical processes.

    volcanoes which have erupted in the last 50years which are identified by the red spots on the map and as can be seen, they occur on plate margins where the magma can rise to the surface. Also the Ring of Fire is pointed out which is an area in the

  2. Compare and contrast the Philippines and Californian hotspots, giving an opinion as to which ...

    However, a lot of money has gone into channelising rivers away from high-risk areas. That was an example of flooding in California with failed protection yet the Philippines has suffered far worse because of their incapacity to deal with the magnitude.

  1. California and the Phillippines - Hazard Hotspots and Human Management of Risks

    5. Emergency procedures have been also put in place. For example Action plan on what will happen in certain scenarios. Also emergency authorities like hospitals have been informed of routes to take during such an event, this means that more people are saved if this event took place. Thus, perceived risk in California is very low due to such measure put in place.

  2. Volcanic and seismic events are major pieces of evidence towards proving that plate-tectonics theory ...

    These hypothesis is enforced by the fact that the present day climates of present South America, Africa, India, Australia, and Antarctica range from tropical to polar and are much too diverse to support the type of plants in the Glossopteris ï¬ora.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work