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Why did the population of the UK rise dramatically between 1760 and 1870.

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Introduction

The population of the UK rose dramatically between 1760 and 1870. In this essay I am going to discuss how the population of the UK rose and fell and why. Basically there are only four factors in which the population of the UK had changed these are; the birth rate, the death rate, emigration and immigration. I am going to explain how each of these factors had a part in the change of population. Firstly I will discuss birth rate, and how it caused the surge of population changes. Firstly, Age and Sex of the Population was one factor which caused a change in the population. In 1851 roughly 50% of the population of England and Wales were under 23. The industrial towns generally had a greater proportion of younger people than rural areas. In those parts of the rural areas the number of old people was above average. Since there were few women of child-bearing age the birth rate tended to be lower. Due to the higher amount of jobs available many people migrated from the countryside to towns. Having a job meant that they could settle down earlier and get married. In addition the towns offered far greater opportunities of finding a partner than the countryside. Secondly, family size was another factor to the problem of population surge. ...read more.

Middle

This was a disease carried by the fleas of the black rat nevertheless by the eighteenth century the plague ceased to be a problem because for some unknown reason the black rat was overtaken by the brown rat. The worst disease of the nineteenth century was of cholera. The first outbreak of cholera was from Sunderland in 1831. As a result it caused the death of over 50,000 people. Furthermore, in 1849 there was yet another outbreak with 55.000 deaths. Secondly, alcoholism also caused a stir in the population change between 1720 and 1751. Alcoholism caused the death of large numbers of people, from the result of 'cheap gin'. This was available at a very low price. The poor saw gin as a cheap way to forget their problems. Literally a child could walk in and buy some gin that was how serious it was. Moreover, medical advances saw the reduction of death rates in the eighteenth century. Better cleaner hospitals for example the extermination of the wooden beds for the iron beds; higher standards of nursing, advances in surgery, new medicines and drugs and higher births in hospitals were the main things that lowered the death rate. Some historians said that the medical care did 'more harm than good' There were good as well as bad hospitals around in the eighteenth century. ...read more.

Conclusion

The most number of people that emigrated was that of Ireland at a total of 3,927,000 which was an estimate of 2/3 of the total. This was because of the potato crop that failed in Ireland. Despite the emigration of over 6million people the UK's population still continued to rise. Some of the Scots and Irish migrated to England where they worked, the Scottish done engineering work whereas the Irish done labour work. Lastly immigration, Immigration is when some enters a country for example a person from abroad comes to live in England. The Irish were being 'pulled' out of the UK by other countries such as Australia because they were offering free land and a better life and so the gold rush in California which made the Irish believe that they could get rich quick. The Irish were also being pushed out because of the failed potato crop, they had to make a choice stay in Ireland and starve to death or go abroad where you can get free land and food. So in conclusion the rise in population was because of the high birth rate and low death rate, age of the population, family size, marriage and employment and some medical advances. The high death rate was because of the epidemic diseases, hygiene and alcoholism. In my opinion I believe that the cause for the rise in population was because of the high birth rate and low death rate. By Rickesh Bhopal 10T ...read more.

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