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AS Health, Unit 2, AO1

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Introduction

In this section a will be writing about communication and what types there are. There are four types of communication used in care settings; these are oral communication, written communication, computerised communication & special methods communication. These are all needed for a care setting to work well within itself & help them to be organised & well structured. Purpose of communication... Examples of where & how used... To give information At a GP surgery or health centre to let service users know what services are available to them and when. To obtain information When enrolling a child at play group, nursery or with childminder to make sure that the parents' or main carers' name, address and contact numbers are accurate. To exchange ideas At a day care centre when groups of older people are talking about their present or past experiences and sharing current news items. Oral Communication: When talking to people, non-verbal signals such as hand gestures or smiles, as well as speech are often used. This is known as 'body language' and is a form of giving messages to those with who we are speaking to. Other types of oral communication are face-to-face and one-to-one. It's also used over the phone and in big groups. ...read more.

Middle

However, a disadvantage is that on some occasions they can be lost and as a consequence the sender has to repeat the process. Systems have to be secure in order to ensure confidentiality is kept. The internet is increasingly being used as a source of information for a variety of purposes. In health, social care and early year's settings computers can also be used for networking organisations, like sending work or emails from schools to parents. As well as one teacher emailing another about something in school, or about a student. Special Methods Communication: There are many special methods of communication; these are Braille, Sign Language, Makaton and Interpreters. Braille: This system is one of raised dots that can be felt with a finger. This is for those who have limited vision or are blind. It provides the opportunity for independent reading and writing as it is based on 'touch'. An example of this is sign's on doors, like toilets so they know which is male & which is female. Or at a doctors surgery so they know what room their doctor's in. Sign Language: This system is used by the deaf, where the words and phrases consist of hand gestures, motions, positions for each letter of the alphabet and any words / sentences you may want to use, as well as facial expressions. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also the way in which you sit in group communication is important too. When having a discussion it's important that the whole group can see and hear everyone. In this scenario chairs will often be arranged in a circle to enable everyone taking part to communicate well, verbally and non-verbally. Having the group sat in this way may suggest that each individual is equal and that everyone will be expected to participate and communicate with everyone else. However, at lectures and other formal meetings / scenarios the seating will be in rows and the message sent out will be that you're being spoken to; you may not speak to those around you but can ask questions. Less formal seating arrangements could create blocks, for example classroom seating has desks or tables. This type of seating can make people feel separated a not a part of the whole group, they're attitude will be 'well I'll take part if i feel like it'. Codes of Practice When caring for patients and service users, carers must respect each service user as an individual, obtain consent before you give any treatment or care, protect confidential information, co-operate with others in the team, maintain your professional knowledge & competence, be trustworthy, and act to identify & minimise risk to patients & service users. ...read more.

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