• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

AS Health, Unit 2, AO1

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In this section a will be writing about communication and what types there are. There are four types of communication used in care settings; these are oral communication, written communication, computerised communication & special methods communication. These are all needed for a care setting to work well within itself & help them to be organised & well structured. Purpose of communication... Examples of where & how used... To give information At a GP surgery or health centre to let service users know what services are available to them and when. To obtain information When enrolling a child at play group, nursery or with childminder to make sure that the parents' or main carers' name, address and contact numbers are accurate. To exchange ideas At a day care centre when groups of older people are talking about their present or past experiences and sharing current news items. Oral Communication: When talking to people, non-verbal signals such as hand gestures or smiles, as well as speech are often used. This is known as 'body language' and is a form of giving messages to those with who we are speaking to. Other types of oral communication are face-to-face and one-to-one. It's also used over the phone and in big groups. ...read more.

Middle

However, a disadvantage is that on some occasions they can be lost and as a consequence the sender has to repeat the process. Systems have to be secure in order to ensure confidentiality is kept. The internet is increasingly being used as a source of information for a variety of purposes. In health, social care and early year's settings computers can also be used for networking organisations, like sending work or emails from schools to parents. As well as one teacher emailing another about something in school, or about a student. Special Methods Communication: There are many special methods of communication; these are Braille, Sign Language, Makaton and Interpreters. Braille: This system is one of raised dots that can be felt with a finger. This is for those who have limited vision or are blind. It provides the opportunity for independent reading and writing as it is based on 'touch'. An example of this is sign's on doors, like toilets so they know which is male & which is female. Or at a doctors surgery so they know what room their doctor's in. Sign Language: This system is used by the deaf, where the words and phrases consist of hand gestures, motions, positions for each letter of the alphabet and any words / sentences you may want to use, as well as facial expressions. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also the way in which you sit in group communication is important too. When having a discussion it's important that the whole group can see and hear everyone. In this scenario chairs will often be arranged in a circle to enable everyone taking part to communicate well, verbally and non-verbally. Having the group sat in this way may suggest that each individual is equal and that everyone will be expected to participate and communicate with everyone else. However, at lectures and other formal meetings / scenarios the seating will be in rows and the message sent out will be that you're being spoken to; you may not speak to those around you but can ask questions. Less formal seating arrangements could create blocks, for example classroom seating has desks or tables. This type of seating can make people feel separated a not a part of the whole group, they're attitude will be 'well I'll take part if i feel like it'. Codes of Practice When caring for patients and service users, carers must respect each service user as an individual, obtain consent before you give any treatment or care, protect confidential information, co-operate with others in the team, maintain your professional knowledge & competence, be trustworthy, and act to identify & minimise risk to patients & service users. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Health & Social Care: Unit 3 AO1

    4 star(s)

    Well-being is, as this web definition says, "a good or satisfactory condition of existence; a state characterized by health, happiness, and prosperity;" it is defined as being positive, in good health or condition, it is best summed up as the quality of life that someone has.

  2. Free essay

    Child Development (AO1)

    He still sees the speech therapist occasionally, to make sure he is coping ok. This is just for a safety precaution to make sure the problem does not occur again. Jayden is very fortunate to have his family's love and support throughout his education and general well being.

  1. Health and Social Care Unit 3 Health and Well being

    Because most of them are attached to GP Practices they also work with all patients registered with a GP Practice. Health visitors look at the broader picture to identify the health needs within their community and this allows them to affect local policy.

  2. Health and Social Care Communication. Examples from work with a service user with ...

    According to http://raisingchildren.net.au/ there are three main types of playgroups. They are the following: 1. Mainstream playgroups are self-managed by the parents and carers who use them. According to the website, about 92000 families a year go to about 8100 mainstream playgroups.

  1. Types of communication including factors that support and inhibit communication within a care setting ...

    surgery is closed so they decide to type in their symptoms into NHS direct which helps give them advice about what is wrong with their health and what they need to do to put their health back stable. This helps to make the client feel comforted and put at ease

  2. Unit 2 Communication in Health and Social Care. Examples from a Day Nursery.

    Active listening isn?t just hearing what?s being said it?s also about understanding what?s being said. These are 5 things that show you are actively listening to someone looking at the person, having an open body posture, leading slightly forward when that person is talking, giving that person eye contact and lastly looking relaxed.

  1. Promoting Good Health- Unit AO1.

    Someone with this concept of health is unlikely to view themselves as ill if they are a bit run down or depressed. To define holistic health is if you are not well in one area, it affects the other areas of your being.

  2. Health and social care unit 7 - AO1. I will be describing the ...

    By children ?banking? plenty of bone in there early years, it puts the skeleton in a better position to withstand the bone loss that occurs with advancing age. Strong bones are essential for long-term health and well-being. Building strong bones is to lower children?s chances of developing osteoporosis in later life.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work