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Btech National Diployma life stages Merit 3

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Introduction

Life stages Merit 3 Use examples to compare two major theories of ageing: Use examples from your placement or family surroundings to compare two major theories of ageing The disengagement theory suggests that older people will withdraw their social contact with others due to reduced physical health and a loss of social opportunities whereas the activity theory argues that older people need to stay mentally and socially active to limit the risks associated with disengagement. 'This mutual withdrawal or disengagement is a natural, acceptable, and universal process that accompanies growing old. It is applicable to elders in all cultures, although there might be variations. According to this theory, disengagement benefits both the older population and the social system.' Cumming and Henry 1961 http://www.yousaytoo.com/disengagement-theory-of-aging/140578 Zimbardo (1992) states the following: 'The disengagement view of a social ageing has been largely discredited for a number of reasons' he argued this as he believed that majority of elder people stay in social contact both with family and friends. ...read more.

Middle

I feel the activist theory is best for my granny as she is a very happy woman and is in general good health both mentally and physically due to this. My paternal grandmother died at the age of 76, she was unwell for the last 15 years of her life. She would have fitted into the disengagement theory. She would have been in a nursing home only my granddad was capable of looking after her; he did everything for her from cleaning the house, cooking meals and even washing and dressing her. However her illness never stopped her from doing all these things but because granddad had done everything for her there was no need for her too. Granny had no independence and stayed in the house all day everyday. She had no activities to help keep her mentally or physically fit. She seemed very sad and lonely in the last few years of her life with little or no friends to talk to. ...read more.

Conclusion

He also plays bowls once a week in his local centre. He also has a gym in his house as he understands the importance of keeping the body physically active. He is always doing puzzles such as Sudoku and crosswords to help keep his brain active. This man lives a very happy and active life and will continue to do so until he can no more. He clearly fits into the active theory. Overall I think if the human body is capable of being active and if the human mind is in a well enough state that the active theory is the best. I personally feel people are happier and independent. However, for some people who are not capable of this independence and would find it too difficult to keep up then I do believe the disengagement theory is relevant for them but I don't think they should be 100% disengaged as they still need people to talk to and share their memories with. ?? ?? ?? ?? Emma McMahon Merit 3 Final Draft ...read more.

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