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Cache level 3 unit 3- The Children Act 1989 has influenced setting by bringing together several sets of guidance and provided the foundation for many of the standards practitioners sustain and maintain when working with children.

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Introduction

Unit three- Supporting children The Children Act 1989 came into effect in 1991 in England and Wales, it attempted to bring together various pieces of legislation. It is wide ranging and covers child protection, parental responsibility and the inspection of settings. It is especially known for its stance that children's welfare is of paramount importance. It also made clear that children and young people's views had to be taken into consideration when decisions about their future were being made. There has been a subsequent Children Act which provided for a Children's Commissioner and also allowed the government to provide a legal framework for the Every Child Matters programme. The Children Act 2004 is designed to ensure that difference services for children and young people work more effectively together. The Children Act 1989 has influenced setting by bringing together several sets of guidance and provided the foundation for many of the standards practitioners sustain and maintain when working with children. The Act requires that settings work together in the best interests of the child and that they form partnerships with parents /carers. It requires settings to have appropriate adult: child ratios and policies and procedures on child protection. This Act has had an influence in all areas of practice from planning a curriculum and record keeping. The Every Child Matters framework has influenced settings by giving them and other external organisations a duty to find new ways of working together by sharing information and working co-operatively to protect children from harm. Race Relations Act 1976 The Race Relations Act 1976 aimed to define racial discrimination. This Act made it illegal to discriminate against anyone on the basis of their ethnicity, skin, colour or race. It applies to employment opportunities within a setting but also the way that a setting might treat a child or their parents. In 2000 there was an amendment to the Race Relations Act which strengthened some of the requirements of the earlier legislation and make settings work towards racial equality. ...read more.

Middle

There are many ways that early learning and child care practitioners can help children to feel heard. During circle times children can be encouraged to share their personal stories, opinions and feelings. Practitioners can encourage children to speak by posing open-ended questions, which will give them the chance to speak and to elaborate. If a child demonstrates interest in something, practitioners can follow up by offering more opportunities for children to try activities related to his interests. By following up on the discussion initiated by the child's question, it showed the child that the practitioner has heard and appreciated his expression of interest. When children's questions are taken seriously they feel validated and comfortable to seek answers. Empowering children to seek answers engages them in the learning process. Giving children choice is important as everyone likes to have choices in the activities they participate in. Some child care providers think they need to do all the planning and can forget that children need choices. There are some children who will just go along with whatever an adult tells them to do. Others will become angry because they aren't given the chance to choose for themselves. By giving children choices helps them feel like they have some power and control over what they do. It's a step in growing up. Everything isn't planned for them. Making good choices is a skill that children will use for the rest of their lives. When children are given some guided choices appropriately and gradually or whenever possible rather than given commands all the time this helps to build up their decision making ability and self confidence. This is by far better than giving commands alone as giving children commands in upbringing stifles the child's decision making ability which may result in an overly dependant mindset and a general lack of self confidence. However, practitioners and parents need to limit the type and number of choices that they give children and for certain life changing and key issues, for example they have no choice in regards whether to do their homework, it is compulsory to do their homework. ...read more.

Conclusion

Inequality and discrimination has a negative effect even if they haven't been a target of discrimination All children have the right to equal access and opportunity of experiences; this does not happen by chance, it has to be carefully planned and effectively monitored. Children have the right to learn that people must all be valued equally. Children learn through imitation. They need to have good role models. If an individual acts in an anti-discriminatory way in their presence they are more likely to do so too. It is therefore important that in all that the child carer does they must help the child learn that all people are valuable, whatever their gender, race, ability or background. A practitioner would need to inform parents and keep them involved with how a practitioner approaches this strategy in order to maintain their support. This will also help a practitioner to ensure they are serving the best interests of your families, respecting families who may not want their cultural differences emphasised in isolation. Practitioners must agree the approach to challenging discrimination by anyone within their setting; this must be reviewed and discussed regularly. By developing a strategy for equality of opportunity practitioners need to carefully evaluate and challenge their misconceptions, fears and prejudices in order to take care that they do not pass these on to the children in their care. Incorporate anti - discriminatory activities into daily curriculum planning; not add them on as an appendage or special event. Plan how to intervene in any discriminatory interactions between children and teach children to care, think critically about and act against discriminatory behaviour. Most child care settings do have good, clear written polices about anti-discrimination which make it plain that prejudice and discrimination will not be tolerated The child care setting will need to examine whether its practice is inclusive and anti-discriminatory from the perspective of each of the many groups that make up our society and also whether the principles of inclusion are applied to all areas of the child care setting's practice. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a very good essay that demonstrates some excellent research skills. It is a little unclear in places as to whether the writer is discussing safeguarding or supporting.

There are good examples of how the use of the correct terminology can greatly enhance work.

The work could be extended in places by discussing the impact that factors can have on the child.

4 Stars

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 24/10/2013

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