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Concepts associated with nutritional health - unit 21

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Introduction

´╗┐Concepts associated with nutritional health P1 Carbohydrates (sugars and starch) Eating this in your daily diet provides an important source of energy, and is also good for healthy organ function; it also helps you to respire. Some forms of complex carbs may reduce cholesterol which is very beneficial for your health. Sugar carbohydrates (Monosaccharide?s) which are the simplest form of carbohydrates e.g. glucose, fructose and galactose. Starchy carbohydrates (polysaccharides) which are made up of many monosaccharide?s? molecules joined together, e.g. starch, glycogen, cellulose and pectin. Without a sufficient amount of carbohydrates in the diet, you can suffer from kwashiorkor and Marasmus disease which area deficiency disease, which can develop in extreme conditions. These occur when energy and protein are lacking in the diet over an extended amount of time. You can get your daily amount of Carbohydrates from foods such as Cereal, Bananas, chocolate, bread and pasta, as well as so many more. Protein Protein is needed for growth, development and repair. Adults need 8 indispensable amino acids, whereas children need 10. Pregnant women need protein for lactation, and also for the growth of the baby. Protein is made up of different combinations of amino acids; these are the building blocks of protein. Amino acids are compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and in some cases sulphur. Protein deficiency is rare, but there is a condition called PEM (protein energy malnutrition). This can be seen in infants with stunted growth or thin are and legs, and large distended abdomens. You can find protein in foods such as meats, fish, nuts, tofu, eggs, dairy and cereal. Saturated fat Saturated fats are an important component in our diet and should not be eliminated from the diet entirely. Saturated fats are used to build cell membranes and a large component of very important hormones. They are also the preferred fuel for your heart and a number of other tissues. ...read more.

Middle

But it doesn't apply to children under the age of two because they have different nutritional needs. Between the ages of two and five, children should gradually move to eating the same foods as the rest of the family, in the proportions shown on the eat well plate. As babies and toddlers only drink breast milk/instant formula their nutritional needs differ to adults. The eat well plate is a visual representation of how different foods contribute towards a healthy balanced diet. The plate model has been tested extensively with consumers and health professionals, and has been proven to help people maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle. Food labeling Labelling is an important process in the food processing chain and should not be overlooked. The label is the first point of contact between a consumer and the producer. It is used to identify one product from another and also to make a decision over which product to purchase. The label is therefore the most important marketing tool for a product. Important points of food labelling: 1. Product name 2. Manufactures name and address 3. Date of manufacture, and best before date 4. Ingredients (in descending order of weight) 5. If product contains nuts, additives, wheat, gluten etc. 6. If product is vegan/vegetarian approved M1 A pregnant woman, and a teenagers diet varies greatly. Due to the nutrient and vitamins needed to keep the specific person fit and healthy. As well as many differences in diet, there are also many similarities including: 1. A healthy intake of calcium. Due to the mother breastfeeding she is in need of extra calcium, and teenagers require it for growing and thickening. 2. Both require folic acid. This can be found in green leafy vegetables, oranges, bread and fortified cereals. This is needed for rapid cell division, and growth. 3. Teenagers will need 80% more protein than an adult, and a pregnant woman will need 10% more than when not pregnant. ...read more.

Conclusion

Oesophagus: Once you swallow the food moves into the Oesophagus where continual waves push the food into the stomach. Stomach: The stomach is a large, sack-like organ that churns the food and bathes it in a very strong acid (gastric acid). Food in the stomach that is partly digested and mixed with stomach acids is called chyme. Small intestine: After being in the stomach, food enters the duodenum, the first part of the small intestine. It then enters the jejunum and then the ileum (the final part of the small intestine). In the small intestine, bile (produced in the liver and stored in the gall bladder), pancreatic enzymes, and other digestive enzymes produced by the inner wall of the small intestine help in the breakdown of food. In the large intestine - After passing through the small intestine, food passes into the large intestine. In the large intestine, some of the water is removed from the food. Many microbes in the large intestine help in the digestion process. The first part of the large intestine is called the. Food then travels upward in the ascending colon. The food travels across the abdomen in the transverse colon, goes back down the other side of the body in the descending colon, and then through the sigmoid colon. The end of the process - Solid waste is then stored in the rectum until it is excreted via the anus. Where macronutrients are broken down Carbohydrates are broken down by the digestive system into simple sugars. These sugars are taken to the bloodstream and then delivered to cells in your body with the help of a hormone called insulin. In the cells, these sugars provide energy to your body. Protein is what makes up bodily tissues, like the muscles, skin and organs. When you eat food containing protein, your digestive system breaks it down into smaller parts called amino acids. These amino acids are later used by the body to build and repair cells and tissues. Fat is good for you. Your body needs it for proper brain development and to absorb certain vitamins. ...read more.

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