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Describe ways of reflecting on and challenging discriminatory issues in health and social care.

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Introduction

Describe ways of reflecting on and challenging discriminatory issues in health and social care. P6 - Care settings must provide services in such a way that all service users get equal benefit for them. For example a person who does not have English as their first language may require a translator in order to understand the services available and to express a choice about them. One of the most beneficial ways in which a social care setting can challenge anti - discriminatory is through staff development and training this may be done formally through supervision sessions or more informally in the course of day to day working. The manager should supervise the work of their staff, offer advice and guidance in difficult situations and help the workers identify training opportunities to improve their practise. Education and training will help a worker recognise tensions in their work roles, how to begin to deal with them, and when to seek management advice. Furthermore, workers who go on to further professional training will be equipped by their training to make more complex decisions that respect service users rights in difficult situations. ...read more.

Middle

All service users should have the choice over what to eat, what to wear, what activities they participate in, how they are addressed by staff and workers, as well as when to get up, have meals and even when to bathe. But above all of these suggested and appropriate work practises, dignity and privacy must be a particular consideration when helping service users with intimate care tasks. Care should be offered in a way that maximises independence and should also be encouraged to do things for themselves, rather than the worker taking over to save time. All care and work practises must be approached with a great degree of tact and support, as all service users are valued and important. To have choice, individuals must be able to understand what is available and express an opinion. Some individuals cannot do either of these things. Advocacy is the process by which they can be helped to do so. Sometimes an advocate may make decisions in their interests and on their behalf. The dictionary defines an advocate as someone who pleads, intercedes or speaks for another. ...read more.

Conclusion

An accessible and easily understood complaints system is a basic part of any organisations policy on equal opportunities. With most complaints procedures there are around 4 main stages. In the first instance, to speak with the member of staff concerned or their manager to see if the issue can be resolved informally, would be sufficient. However, if that does not resolve the issue the procedure would be to make a complaint to a senior manager of the department. The third stage, if the matter is still not resolved, is to request the matter to be referred to a review panel, which would have lay members as well as the representatives from the department in question. If the complainant is still not sufficiently satisfied then they have the right to refer the matter to the Local Government Ombudsman. Overall there are a variety of different ways to reflect on and challenge discriminatory issues in health and social care settings. The examples I have explained are formal and organisational policies, education and training, work practices, advocacy and complaints procedures. All of these examples ensure that services are provided in such a way that all service users get equal benefit and no one is discriminated against. ...read more.

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