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Equality, Diversity and Rights In Health Care

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Introduction

Equality Diversity and Rights in Health Care Assignment 1 ? Equality, Diversity and Rights In Health Care Introduction We live in a multicultural society that has changed enormously over the last 60 years. New arrivals have changed the culture of this society and our health and care services are heavily reliant on a diverse staff from this and other countries. Staff types of work environment have to be aware how to work with people with different cultures, languages and lifestyles, whilst still providing the same level of care for all. The experience of patients/service users has also changed. In the past care was provided in large institutions and control rested heavily in the hands of those providing care. Today things are different: cared for people have clear legal rights and people are encouraged to make their own decisions and to exercise choices. In this assignment I will explain with my own examples the way this modern system of care operates. Task 1 Explain the benefits diversity has brought to the wider British society in terms of education, tolerance, diet, language, expertises, music and the arts. Britain is a multicultural society with a large variety of people from different backgrounds. ...read more.

Middle

(Cover issues of interdependence, acceptance of difference, positive attitudes, not stereotyping, avoiding all forms of discrimination, sexism and homophobia. See PowerPoint. Task 3 Using examples from a care home, a hospital ward and day care, explain how practitioners can implement the care value base by: putting the service user at the centre of their own care; empowering clients; keeping confidentiality and sharing information; enabling choice; and implementing anti-discriminatory practice. Practitioners can implement the Care Base Value by putting the service user at the centre of their own care. Patient?s personal information such as address and date of birth should be kept confidential in a secure place. This must not be shared with others, because it is personal to each individual. You should ensure that the service user?s rights and choices are being respected by promoting anti-discriminatory practice. The seven principles; 1. The promotion of anti-discriminatory practice 2. The promotion and support of dignity, independence and safety 3. Respect for, and acknowledgement of, personal beliefs and an individual?s identity 4. The maintenance of confidentiality 5. Protection from abuse and harm 6. The promotion of effective communication and relationships 7. The provision of personalised (individual) care. These seven principles can be broken down into key concepts; inclusivity; access; trust; confidentiality; choice; participation, honesty and openness; respect and safety. ...read more.

Conclusion

Nursing care is where the patient or service user needs more nursing care compared to a patient in a residential care home. Nursing care covers a wide range of treatment for people of all ages. There are specialised nurses for different parts of a hospital. A few examples could be; practice nurses; health visitors; ward nurses; occupational health nurses, school nurses; mental health nurses and paediatric nurses. Every different kind of nurse works in different settings with different groups of patient. Confidentiality must be maintained. Information should only be shared if the service user gives permission and if it is open and honest information. If the practitioner or carer hasn?t respected the rights of the client/service user this means that the Data Protection Act 1998 has been broken. There is an exception when confidential information can be shared. This is only if the service user is putting others around them and their own life at risk. Task 4 Find a true story from pre-1978 care that illustrates the way people were treated in institutionalised care such as mental hospitals or those for ?mentally handicapped?. What are the differences between this and the modern care system? Identify the key rights you would expect to see in modern care and explain in detail why two of these are at the heart of a good practice. ...read more.

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