• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Explain the probable homeostatic responses to changes in the internal environment following the consumption of a healthy meal

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

M2 Explain the probable homeostatic responses to changes in the internal environment following the consumption of a healthy meal. Homeostasis: Homeostasis is the maintenance of a constant internal environment . The maintenance of homeostasis can occur through the nervous system or through chemical stimulation and changes are achieved and controlled by the homeostasis regulation mechanisms which include sensors, signal transmissions, control centres and also effectors. The above allow the body to adapt to its own environment and therefore allows it to function normally. The reason that we need the internal environment within the body to stay constant is because the enzymes within our body can only work effectively within a certain ph and temperature, if these conditions are not maintained the enzymes will not be able to work and therefore the chemical proteins within the enzymes will not be able to speed up reactions within the body and the enzymes will become denatured, if this occurs this occurs the consequences could be fatal for the individual. Homeostatic mechanisms work by negative feedback as they detect any changes in the boys internal environment and bring about an effect that will reverse the change. ...read more.

Middle

Therefore when we eat a meal the rise is detected within the blood glucose and the islets of langerhans within the pancreas release insulin to bring the levels back down by converting the glucose into glycogen which will then be stored in the liver. The reason for this is because glucose is soluble and is therefore easy to be carried around in the blood it also dissolves very quickly within the blood where as glycogen is in soluble and does not dissolve within the blood as it is stored in the liver until it is needed by the body. The excess glucose from the meal is converted to glycogen and stored in the liver. If we have too little glucose in our blood the body will detect this change and glycogen will be released from the liver and converted into glucose, the reason for this is because the body is in need of more energy e.g. when a person has not eaten. As soon as we start to eat a meal the digestion process occurs in the mouth, breaking the food down into small energy molecules that can be absorbed into the bloodstream. ...read more.

Conclusion

Glucose is the primary fuel used by the brain and is stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. All carbohydrates can be broken down into glucose in the body. Some carbohydrates have a simple structure that easily breaks down into glucose. These are simple carbohydrates, commonly known as sugars e.g. fruits, milk, and other foods, they are digested rapidly which allows the glucose to be absorbed into the bloodstream quickly. Therefore a meal that is high in simple carbohydrates can contribute to reactive hypoglycemia. Complex carbohydrates and proteins are important in the diet. They are a basic source of energy. Complex carbohydrates are many molecules of simple sugars linked together like beads on a string. They take longer to break down in the intestine, and this helps to keep blood glucose levels more consistent. Pasta, grains, and potatoes are complex carbohydrates. Proteins are made of amino acids that the body needs for growth and good health. Most food protein can be converted into glucose by the body, but since this process takes some time, the glucose gets into the bloodstream at a slower, more consistent pace. That is why people with reactive hypoglycemia should eat complex carbohydrates and protein for their energy needs, instead of simple carbohydrates. BTEC Nat Diploma Health Studies Ashley Kean ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

4 stars
This essay explains the principles of homeostasis with reference to maintaining blood glucose levels. It is set out logAically, with mostly good content linking to the roles of the pancreas and liver, alongside insulin and glucagon. Areas for improvement, or extension of knowledge and understanding, have been identified within the marking comments. There is some content towards the second half of the essay which is not required in order to meet the essay title.

Marked by teacher Jenny Spice 05/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The Role of Energy in the Body and the Physiology of Three Named Body ...

    5 star(s)

    Structure and Function of the Trachea and Bronchi. The trachea commences at the back of the throat, or pharynx, and divides into two mains bronchi, each serving one lung on each side of the heart. The first part of the trachea is specially adapted to produce sound and is called the larynx, or voice box.

  2. P1 & P2 Public Health

    P2 Within this assignment I will look closely at the historical perspectives of the public health system in the UK. Public health has developed considerably over many years and the changes occurred over time reflect the health concerns of the nation during each time period.

  1. Types of communication including factors that support and inhibit communication within a care setting ...

    service provider for developing empathy with the client which can prevent them valuing the client. It is important that if a client has a stigma again a health and social care environment that the service user helps remove this stigma so the client is not fearful which could inhibit the

  2. Unit 21 Nutrition for health and social care

    For those who cannot prepare any meals independently, a home care assistant, relative or neighbour might help. If a cooked lunch has been provided, many people will be happy with a flask of hot drink or a soup and a light evening meal left in the fridge, covered to keep it fresh.

  1. Health and Social Care Unit 3 Health and Well being

    (A01-A3) A comprehensive description that shows an in depth understanding of health and well-being. Can you give a definition of health and well-being? Health and well-being as being holistic health; Holistic health and the Social model of health our very similar.

  2. Report on Counselling for Health and Social Care

    Non-verbal responses consist of: Eye contact. Maintaining eye contact without staring demonstrates sincere interest. Be sure to consider cultural differences in determining proper eye contact. 1. Body posture. Avoid slouching and being relaxed. 2. Nodding the head demonstrate agreement and encourages to the client to continue to communicate.

  1. Unit 5 P3: Outline the gross structure of all main body systems

    Digestive enzymes in the juices catalyse the breakdown of food Respiratory System: The lungs do not work alone they depend on the muscles of individuals rib cages to help especially the diaphragm when we breathe in your diaphragm tightens

  2. Health and Social Care Communication. Examples from work with a service user with ...

    will plan it for in the morning when we are both rested. Will I plan all the dates at one time? I need to consider how my decision about this will affect the running of the session. Does it fit with the aims, objectives and outcomes that need to be achieved?

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work