• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16

Health and Disease

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

UNIT 3 - POSITIVE CARE ENVIRONMENT INTRODUCTION As part of my health and social care, a level, I have to produce a report on unit 3, which is on positive care environments. For this report I have to choose a placement and also choose a setting or a service user group to base this report on. Here are the following settings or service user groups that I will have to choose from to base my report on: * Health * Early years * Care of older people * Individuals with specific needs The setting or the service user group that I will be focusing on is: * Early years And the placement that I have chosen to base my report on is: * Nursery The purpose/objectives of this report will be the following: * The rights of service users when accessing services * The potential barriers experienced by that service user group when accessing services, and the effects of these barriers * Practitioner and organisational policies and practices designed to create a positive care environment, application of relevant policies and procedures adopted and implemented by the organisation which promote positive access for their particular service user group * Evaluation of how legislation safeguards and promotes the rights of service users, explaining organisations responsibilities under relevant legislation and explain methods of redress open to service users. THEORY WHAT ARE VALUES? Values are beliefs that identify "something that is valued" or "valuable" in a situation. Beliefs and values can influence what people do and the choices and the decision that they make. VALUES & INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS A positive care environment makes an enormous difference to the quality of life of both the service user ands and the staff. Today a lot of care takes place in people's homes, but where ever care is provided it is important to create a positive care environment and require ongoing maintenance. ...read more.

Middle

All local authorities must have a complaints procedure. This was required by the Local Authorities and Social Services Act 1970. The department of health has also issued further regulations. The children's Act 1989 requires complaints procedures for actions involving children and families, so does the NHS and community care Act 1990. Many care environment are privately owned or in the voluntary sector. The requirements of the care standards Act 2000 have to be followed. BARRIERS TO ACCESS Language/ communication barriers - People who do not speak English as their first language will need an interpreter or translator to be able to find out about and be appropriately assessed for services. People who communicate using British Sign Language will also need an interpreter in order to access services. Having to access a different language system is an obvious barrier, but even with the same language, terminology can create a barrier to understand. Organisational barriers - Sometimes organisations have systems in place that unintentionally excludes certain people. Many organisations expect staff to work long hours and to put family commitments second to work commitments. Promotion to senior post may depend on always being available to do overtime. But such organisation culture might create a barrier for people who have child care responsibilities. Emotional barriers - Many people do not perceive themselves as carers or as in need of services. One of the emotional barriers to accessing services is that people do not like to see themselves as needy or dependent. The name of some benefits also set up emotional barriers. For example, attendance allowance suggests that a claimant has to have someone attending to them. Stereotypes exist around characteristics that particular groups are believed to show. These can impact and create barriers, sometimes with devastating consequences. Geographical and physical barriers - Rural areas are often very poorly served with services. This is often made worst by the lack of reliable and affordable transport. ...read more.

Conclusion

The words were "like", "no", "naughty". I also think that this barrier would affect the children in expressing them selves and also this barrier would not be able to be broken down. I found the policies and procedures very simple and helped to create a positive care environment and user friendly for the children to follow in the class room (i.e. Rules) and for the parents and staff, the terms and condition, again very simple and in accordance with the laws applicable to the nursery. Obviously the children, parents and staff try to do their best to follow these policies in order to create a positive, and friendly environment for each other, but there is no doubt somewhere down the line someone either disagrees or wants to go against these rules or even is unaware and through ignorance fail to follow them. This then causes problems, which is rare, but not unknown, as the teachers too well know. The teachers I found tried to their best to the extent they could and all in all were quite successful in achieving their goals and objectives of the nursery in line with the discussed rules. Due to lack of time and resources available, I was not able carryout research in other areas of the positive care environments and therefore I could not do this portfolio in detail. If further studies were to be undertaken and more information obtained from the organisation, I feel I could have found out much more about how these areas interact with each other and I would have seen a wider picture. If I had more time I would of carried individual interactions and more group interactions to find out more on this portfolio and I would have compared my findings to see what results I would get. But due to external resources being very restrictive and time constraints I was some what held back. Nevertheless, if I were to attempt again I would definitely compare other care environments against this one. ?? ?? ?? ?? MOBEEN AKRAM 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Equality, diversity and rights

    Social class - A social class is a way of grouping people it can be a based discrimination for many reasons. The higher social class are said to be looked down on the lower social classes. This is because what type of job they do and how much money do they earn.

  2. communication and values

    her "what do you like doing instead of do you like playing football. From answer I found that asking open questions breaks the silence and also encouraged her to talk more to me. I made sure I did not ask her too many questions as she would have taken it as a demanding conversation rather then a friendly talk.

  1. I will be analysing the rights of services within a positive care environment. Some ...

    Cedar Foundation, the different services provided would be Kids and Teens, Employment and learning services, Brain Injury services, Living accommodations support. Each of these services help service users get the rights and help they need, the rights are also linked to the care value base, as both promote the rights and needs, and can also help care practitioners.

  2. I will be focusing on the positive care environment using early years. I will ...

    of his or her racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation. An example of this is turning a person down for a job as of their age, gender or race. Indirect discrimination is when an apparently neutral specification, criteria or practice would disadvantage people on

  1. Health and social care unit 7 - AO1. I will be describing the ...

    By children ?banking? plenty of bone in there early years, it puts the skeleton in a better position to withstand the bone loss that occurs with advancing age. Strong bones are essential for long-term health and well-being. Building strong bones is to lower children?s chances of developing osteoporosis in later life.

  2. Unit 2 Communication in Health and Social Care. Examples from a Day Nursery.

    Anti discrimination practice- A number of laws were put in place to ensure discrimination doesn?t occur. By providing an antidiscrimination practise patients can receive the best health care without it affecting their quality of life through the following things: verbal abuse, neglect, exclusion, physical abuse and avoidance of being near that person.

  1. Health and Social Care Unit 3 Health and Well being

    much this may lead to problems with their mind, this may include problems with remembering things, not being able to complete a task properly. Alcohol affects a person emotionally by magnifying existing emotions. This means that if a person is depressed when they are drinking they will become more depressed after they have drunk.

  2. Health and Social Care Communication. Examples from work with a service user with ...

    from activities we may have done or experiences we may have had. Memory has tried to be defined through models produced by psychological theorists. Memory has two systems according to the Multi-Store Model by Atkinson and Shriffin (1968). They made a model of memory: first sensory memory, everything from the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work