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Health and Disease

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

UNIT 3 - POSITIVE CARE ENVIRONMENT INTRODUCTION As part of my health and social care, a level, I have to produce a report on unit 3, which is on positive care environments. For this report I have to choose a placement and also choose a setting or a service user group to base this report on. Here are the following settings or service user groups that I will have to choose from to base my report on: * Health * Early years * Care of older people * Individuals with specific needs The setting or the service user group that I will be focusing on is: * Early years And the placement that I have chosen to base my report on is: * Nursery The purpose/objectives of this report will be the following: * The rights of service users when accessing services * The potential barriers experienced by that service user group when accessing services, and the effects of these barriers * Practitioner and organisational policies and practices designed to create a positive care environment, application of relevant policies and procedures adopted and implemented by the organisation which promote positive access for their particular service user group * Evaluation of how legislation safeguards and promotes the rights of service users, explaining organisations responsibilities under relevant legislation and explain methods of redress open to service users. THEORY WHAT ARE VALUES? Values are beliefs that identify "something that is valued" or "valuable" in a situation. Beliefs and values can influence what people do and the choices and the decision that they make. VALUES & INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS A positive care environment makes an enormous difference to the quality of life of both the service user ands and the staff. Today a lot of care takes place in people's homes, but where ever care is provided it is important to create a positive care environment and require ongoing maintenance. ...read more.

Middle

All local authorities must have a complaints procedure. This was required by the Local Authorities and Social Services Act 1970. The department of health has also issued further regulations. The children's Act 1989 requires complaints procedures for actions involving children and families, so does the NHS and community care Act 1990. Many care environment are privately owned or in the voluntary sector. The requirements of the care standards Act 2000 have to be followed. BARRIERS TO ACCESS Language/ communication barriers - People who do not speak English as their first language will need an interpreter or translator to be able to find out about and be appropriately assessed for services. People who communicate using British Sign Language will also need an interpreter in order to access services. Having to access a different language system is an obvious barrier, but even with the same language, terminology can create a barrier to understand. Organisational barriers - Sometimes organisations have systems in place that unintentionally excludes certain people. Many organisations expect staff to work long hours and to put family commitments second to work commitments. Promotion to senior post may depend on always being available to do overtime. But such organisation culture might create a barrier for people who have child care responsibilities. Emotional barriers - Many people do not perceive themselves as carers or as in need of services. One of the emotional barriers to accessing services is that people do not like to see themselves as needy or dependent. The name of some benefits also set up emotional barriers. For example, attendance allowance suggests that a claimant has to have someone attending to them. Stereotypes exist around characteristics that particular groups are believed to show. These can impact and create barriers, sometimes with devastating consequences. Geographical and physical barriers - Rural areas are often very poorly served with services. This is often made worst by the lack of reliable and affordable transport. ...read more.

Conclusion

The words were "like", "no", "naughty". I also think that this barrier would affect the children in expressing them selves and also this barrier would not be able to be broken down. I found the policies and procedures very simple and helped to create a positive care environment and user friendly for the children to follow in the class room (i.e. Rules) and for the parents and staff, the terms and condition, again very simple and in accordance with the laws applicable to the nursery. Obviously the children, parents and staff try to do their best to follow these policies in order to create a positive, and friendly environment for each other, but there is no doubt somewhere down the line someone either disagrees or wants to go against these rules or even is unaware and through ignorance fail to follow them. This then causes problems, which is rare, but not unknown, as the teachers too well know. The teachers I found tried to their best to the extent they could and all in all were quite successful in achieving their goals and objectives of the nursery in line with the discussed rules. Due to lack of time and resources available, I was not able carryout research in other areas of the positive care environments and therefore I could not do this portfolio in detail. If further studies were to be undertaken and more information obtained from the organisation, I feel I could have found out much more about how these areas interact with each other and I would have seen a wider picture. If I had more time I would of carried individual interactions and more group interactions to find out more on this portfolio and I would have compared my findings to see what results I would get. But due to external resources being very restrictive and time constraints I was some what held back. Nevertheless, if I were to attempt again I would definitely compare other care environments against this one. ?? ?? ?? ?? MOBEEN AKRAM 1 ...read more.

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