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Health And Social Care Coursework

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Introduction

Group Interaction Work Context My Group interaction consisted of me being put in place of someone in the medical profession talking to a group of people about recent treatments/illnesses. I chose to speak to a group of children in their playroom in a nursery. My interaction took place in a playroom which held many different barriers for me to think about and plan before my interaction took place. I laid the furniture that was available to avoid as many barriers as I could. Also having a range of ages in my group would need to be considered because some would have longer attention spans than others. I laid out the playroom as shown in the diagram below. I wanted to set out so I catered for all ages ranging from 3-7. I only wanted to keep the children there for 5 minutes because of their differing attention spans. As my diagram indicates I set out the playroom very carefully. I laid it out in this way for many of the same reasons as for my one to one. Refer back to my one to one for those reasons. In addition I asked the children where they would like to sit, at the table or on the pillows. ...read more.

Middle

I didn't use Tuckman's example of group interactions which is; Forming - Group asks questions about aims and roles. Leader emerges Storming- Conflict occurs as members argue over purpose. Norming- Group identity develops with a strong set of shared values and norms. Group becomes cohesive Performing- Group gets down to the task, goal is more important than the leader. I didn't use any of these in my group interaction because of the age range of my clients. They were two young to argue over purposes and most of them would have been bored by the time I had finished forming and I would have lost them. I would expect Bales 'different types of communication behaviour expressed by members of a group.' To appear in my interaction, in particular: Proposing- offering new ideas e.g. Supporting- communications that support/agree with the comments of others. Blocking- some of the children employed this when I asked them their opinion of their doctor. But through a series of open questions I will try to negate this behaviour. Information seeking- I used this a lot when trying to extract information about why they had to go to the doctor's. Information giving- most of the group gave me information when I asked them. ...read more.

Conclusion

So I deemed it sensible to end it earlier than intended so the children still liked me. There was no point trying to get information form them whilst in this state. I could of removed yet further barriers in the room we was in by, packing the Lego away, turning the T.V. off, closing the curtains. But this may have made the children switch off even earlier. It was important to make them feel as comfortable as possible so I could extract as much information as possible. If I were to do this interaction with a group of adults who were the same age I would adjust many things. I would modify my language by speaking with longer sentences and use a larger and more complex vocabulary. I would adopt a more formal register to transmit that I was taking the interaction seriously. I would also make us sit on chairs not pillows because sitting them down on pillows would be a patronising. If I were to do this interaction with a group of older people I would adjust many things. I would modify my language again and depending on their condition, use smaller, simpler sentences. However they could take this offensively because they might not be death and would prefer to be spoken to more formally with a larger vocabulary. Assuming they are death would be stereotyping. Sam Hennessy 811 Pre Clinical Portfolio Frances Grew ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A good discussion of an observation carried out with young children. The writer has made some good observations and links the care value base and theory well.

There are a few areas where the work could be expanded - the evaluation in particular. The work could be enhanced by further explanations rather than descriptions.

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Marked by teacher Sam Morran 26/09/2013

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