• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How Dissection Influenced Modern Medicine

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐Daniel Griffin, 1st April, 2012 How Dissection Influenced Modern Medicine The publication of Vesalius? ?On the fabric of the human body? in 1543, virtually created the study of human anatomy. This enlightening piece subsequently set off a chain reaction for countless other anatomical discoveries and is widely recognised as one of the main contributors to the commencement of the ?scientific revolution?. Revealed throughout in the book, for the first time ever, were accurate drawings of the muscular, skeletal, respiratory, circulatory, vascular, and nervous systems. Also featured were illustrations of the heart, the brain, and abdominal organs. Never before had the body been so comprehensively documented layer by layer in such rigorous detail. ...read more.

Middle

One example of this is the monumental ?circulation of blood? theory founded by an inspired William Harvey in 1628. Harvey carried out numerous dissections on animals and humans. It was due to his diligent study of anatomy that he identified the heart was responsible for pumping blood around the body and that blood needed to be preserved rather than ?let? as previously taught by Galen. These insights eventually led to the practice of ?surgical clamping? and the concept of the artificial heart centuries later. Over time, the progressive practice of dissection has eradicated uncertainty and superstition surrounding the human body. From the 18th century onwards, the study of anatomy has been embraced and taught by educational institutions worldwide, transforming people?s view of the body into something that can be explained in terms of mechanics, biology, and chemistry. ...read more.

Conclusion

[Online video]. Retrieved 1st April, 2012, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/andreas-vesalius/3307.html BBC. (2012). William Harvey (1578 - 1657). Retrieved 1st April, 2012, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/harvey_william.shtml Science Museum. William Harvey (1578 - 1657). Retrieved 1st April, 2012, from http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/onlinestuff/People/williamharvey.aspx Science World (2007). William Harvey (1578 - 1657). Retrieved 1st April, 2012, from http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/biography/Harvey.html Vesalius, A. (1555). Public dissection, [Online image], De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septum. Retrieved 1st April, 2012, from http://whitecoatwanderlust.tumblr.com/post/1040170382/the-art-of-anatomy Other: Handwritten notes from Health Studies lesson 14th March 2012. Handwritten notes from Health Studies lesson 21st March 2012. History of Dissection. (PowerPoint hand-out from Health Studies lesson 14th March 2012). Illustrations of public dissections. (A4 hand-out from Health Studies lesson 21st March 2012). Picture of William Harvey & the blood circulation theory. (A4 hand-out from Health Studies lesson 14thMarch 2012). Vesalius? drawing of the human body. (A4 hand-out from Health Studies lesson 14th March 2012). Page of ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work