• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How has public health improved in the 20th Century?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How has public health improved in the 20th Century? The Industrial Revolution paved the way for many factories and a large, poor, working-class population. Therefore, at the beginning of the 20th century, Britain had thousands of factories polluting the environment and millions of poor workers living in squalor. This meant that the most important concerns of public health were better housing and cleaner air. Housing In the cities businesses wanted as many workers near to the factories as possible so that there would be less travel time and more time working. Builders built houses back to back so that they could cut on expenditure and fit more people in. ...read more.

Middle

The government funded the scheme for the first four years and this helped speed up the work. The "homes fit for heroes" scheme improved public health because it created over a quarter of a million new homes. The next step was the "slum clearance" program. This involved areas of bad housing being flagged for improvement. Later the people would be relocated, the houses razed, new improved ones built, then the people would move back. In the 1930's over 700,000 homes were built in connection with this plan. This improved public health because it helped more people out of squalid conditions but unfortunately local councils exaggerated their work and left many still without good housing. ...read more.

Conclusion

By 1971 the smoke pollution entering the atmosphere had been reduced by 65%. This helped improve public health because it greatly reduced long-term affects on people's respiratory organs. This was not all. After the Second World War the National Health Service was created and by 1948 nearly all the hospitals had joined the organization and 92% of doctors had. This improved people's chances because it opened up a new angle on health, it was something for all, anyone could seek advice and get treatment. Unfortunately the demand was so high that the NHS could not cope. By 1960 spending was �726 million. Public Health was also improved through INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATION and COMMUNICATION. The World Health Organization, set up by the United Nations, increased the number of children receiving vaccinations, eradicated smallpox and is working to eradicate polio, malaria and tuberculosis. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

Star rating 3
This essay describes and partially explains three factors that explain how public health improved in the twentieth century. Housing and air pollution, associated with factories, have been considered, and health introduced through the beginnings of the NHS and vaccination. Improvements can be made as is indicated in the feedback provided. There is no referencing nor a bibliography produced.

Marked by teacher Jenny Spice 17/09/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    In this essay I will be both describing and evaluating the different methods used ...

    3 star(s)

    By providing healthy lunches in schools it should lower the levels of obesity and therefore reduce the risks of people contracting chronic diseases linked to poor diet. National No Smoking Day- This method was first established in 1984 on Ash Wednesday.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    History of the National Health Service.

    3 star(s)

    low income population, upper classes could afford to pay for their own treatment and were generally excluded from using the municipal hospital facilities. These hospitals grew in number and by the end of the thirties there were roughly 1750 municipal hospitals in England and Wales, and these provided training facilities for both Nurses and Doctors.

  1. Theories of health and illness

    some diseases have almost been eradicated i.e. small pox and polio. Social depravation effects health, the lack of food, warmth and shelter. Also you have to take into account social and environmental factors an example is young people smoking, drinking, taking drugs and having unsafe sex this can be due to peer pressure, people behave the same

  2. Unit 11 - Working in Health and Social care - SECTION B - SUBSECTION ...

    a care assistant in a residential home in contrast to a brain surgeon. Reports of medical errors or failures in child protection can reduce the public approval on their opinion of a doctor and social worker. A midwifes job status has a very high approval in society and is valued

  1. Mental Health AO4

    Under the mental health act there is sectioning. Sectioning is when an individual can be kept in an institution from 28 days (under Section 2) up to 6 months or longer (under Section 3). They can only be sectioned if they have a metal illness, severe mental impairment or psychotic disorder but only if treatment is necessary.

  2. POSITIVE CARE ENVIRONMENT

    high level of care and are provided with food and water and other needs. Human rights are something we all share. Whether you are a child, adult, service user or anyone. They are about recognising the value and dignity of all people.

  1. Public Health: How are current patterns of ill health monitored? How have current patterns ...

    A rural area is the opposite of an urban area. A rural area is an area that does not have many buildings but instead has mostly large open spaces and is also known as the countryside. The positive effects that a rural area has on an individual?s health are: 1.

  2. Outline current legislation, guidelines policies and procedure within own UK Home Nation affecting the ...

    are likely to suffer significant harm, and facilitate optimal outcomes for those children who have been harmed. Practitioners also have responsibilities for providing extra support to children and young people whose needs are not being met, working with parents and other professionals.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work