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Kidney Disease

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Introduction

Transfer-Encoding: chunked ´╗┐KIDNEY DISEASE Kidney Disease Kidney Disease In the human body, kidneys play a major role in removing waste products and regulating the fluid levels in the blood. These waste products are then excreted from the body as urine. Kidney Disease or Chronic Kidney Failure/Disease (CKD) is best described as gradual loss of the kidney function over time. As kidney failure advances and the organ?s function is seriously impaired, dangerous levels of waste and fluid can rapidly build up in the body. This very serious disease includes many factors that come into play and are all very important to understand and help decrease the progression of this disease. These factors include the disease history, etiology, signs and symptoms, laboratory testing, treatment, prognosis, complications, statistics, and prevention. During the early 1950?s there was very little to no treatment for kidney disease. It was known as a death sentence. It was then that the National Nephrosis Foundation (NNF) was born, but it was primarily used to support families and patients by raising funds for comfort and death expenses. It wasn?t until 1960 that CKD was no longer considered a fatal illness but a chronic disease. This was due to the discovery of the Teflon shunt which solved the problem that had prevented doctors from performing long term treatments. Usually a patient undergoing dialysis suffered from damaged veins and arteries, so that after several treatments, it became difficult to find a vessel to access the patient?s blood. ...read more.

Middle

The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) test measures how much nitrogen from waste product urea is in your blood. BUN levels rise because the kidneys aren't removing enough urea from the blood. A fasting blood glucose test can be done to measure your blood sugar as high levels can indicate damaged blood vessels in the kidneys. Blood test are used to measure levels of waste products and electrolytes in the blood that should be removed by your kidneys. Testing for anemia is important to check if your kidneys are producing enough of the hormone erythropoietin needed for red blood cells. A renal ultrasound helps estimate how long you have had CKD, it checks whether urine flow from the kidneys is blocked, or if there are any other contributing diseases. A doppler study or angiogram of the kidney can check for problems caused by renal artery stenosis. A blood test for the parathyroid hormone checks the levels of calcium and phosphorus essential for bone health. The goal of treatment for CKD is to prevent or slow further damage to the kidneys. Treatment will depend on the stage of CKD. Early stages will require lifestyle changes and medication. Great lifestyle changes include cessation of smoking, eating a healthy low-fat diet, not using NSAIDs (anti-inflammatory) medications, moderating alcohol intake, maintaining a healthy weight, and regularly exercising. Medications will be prescribed by doctors and these following prescriptions will be strongly recommended. ...read more.

Conclusion

Kidneys play a huge role in removing waste products and regulating the fluid levels in the blood. These waste products are toxic to the body and as they build up they can cause further complications and continue reducing function of the kidney. Chronic kidney failure is best described as the gradual loss of the kidney function over time. This very serious disease includes many factors that come into play and are all very important to understand and help decrease the progression of this disease. These factors include the disease history, etiology, signs, and symptoms, laboratory testing, treatment, prognosis, complications, statistics, and prevention. Through patient teaching and family support there are ways to live longer, healthier and better lives. Knowing about the disease often helps because the patient and the family will understand more about what to expect and feel more in control of the illness, instead of feeling like their lives are dominated by the disease and treatment. Self care is an integral part of daily life. The patient must be responsible for their own well being and health, with support from the people around them. Teaching the patient self care will help them stay fit, maintain good physical and mental health, prevent illness and accidents, and overcoming limitations. A good relationship with the healthcare professional can make the patient feel at ease that they are in good hands. All these together will help to give the patient a longer happier life. ...read more.

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