• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

MEASUREMENT OF CHILDHOOD GROWTH

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Growth MEASUREMENT OF CHILDHOOD GROWTH Weight: An infant or toddler should be weighed naked, and an older child with a minimum of clothing. Head Circumference: Maximum circumference around supraorbital ridges & occipital protuberance - may be important diagnostically in the first few years. Height: Supine length (in infants) Stature (standing height with heels & back in contact with an upright surface) Decimal age: Used when recording above measurements - age is stated in tenths of a year - conversion tables are available. ASSESSMENT MEASUREMENT OF CHILDHOOD GROWTH Weight: An infant or toddler should be weighed naked, and an older child with a minimum of clothing. Head Circumference: Maximum circumference around supraorbital ridges & occipital protuberance - may be important diagnostically in the first few years. Height: Supine length (in infants) Stature (standing height with heels & back in contact with an upright surface) ...read more.

Middle

If a child is observed to be changing centiles on a plot then this may indicate an underlying problem, e.g., in the PBL case Toby Stephenson dropped from the 10th centile of weight to the 3rd centile in 3 months. FACTORS AFFECTING GROWTH Genetic: Heritability suggests genetic component Race: May reflect differences in adult body shape, but also nutrition and disease Seasonal effects: Europe and America - growth and height fastest in spring, weight fastest in autumn Nutrition: Malnutrition delays growth, if acute catch up may occur, if chronic often smaller adult Disease: Usually only observable in major illness > one month duration 'catch up' usually occurs when cured. Psychological disturbance: Severe psychological disturbances may reduce growth Adapted from Forfar & Arneils textbook of paediatrics THE THREE PHASES OF GROWTH Infantile - Largely nutrition dependent Childhood - Genetic, hormone, nutrition, psychosocial dependent Pubertal - Genetic, hormone, nutrition, psychosocial dependent The possible causes of poor growth are determined by the phase of growth in which the problem has arisen. ...read more.

Conclusion

will also become slower than expected. FAILURE TO THRIVE CLASSIFICATION Organic: * reduced nutrient intake e.g., mechanical feeding disorder * mal-digestion or mal-absorbtion * excessive loss of nutrients e.g., recurrent vomiting * increased nutrient requirement (underlying disease) * unable to utilise nutrients fully e.g., metabolic disease Non-Organic: * inadequate supply of nutrients * family dysfunction leads to psychological stress * occasionally wilful neglect or abuse Mixed Organic and Non-Organic: * combination e.g., child with mechanical feeding disorder makes child hard to feed so fed less, and so receives inadequate supply of nutrients HISTORY OF PRESENTING SYMPTOMS Organic disease often has characteristic history and findings on clinical examination relevant to the disease e.g., mal-digestion, vomiting. Non-organic often presents as persistent feeding difficulty, poor appetite, fussy eater. TREATMENT Specialist team will treat the underlying disease or disorder. This could include GP, nutritionalist, paediatrician, cardiologist, gastroenterologist, psychologist or a social worker. Problems in home environment are addressed and support is given to child's 'care-giver'. Child may need to hospitalised if malnutrition is severe. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Research In Clinical Practise

    (Tingle and Cribb, 2003). Morrell et al state that their study was 'approved by appropriate ethics committees'. Although the RCT is the gold standard for demonstrating efficacy, it is not always easy or even possible to organize such a study.

  2. Physiological disorder

    The diaphragm does much of this work. At rest it is shaped like a done curving up into your chest and drawing air into your lungs other muscles including the muscles between your ribs also helping moving your ribcage in and out.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work