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Positive Care environments

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Introduction The purpose of this assignment is to investigate how clients gain access to health and social care services. In this report I will be discussing the barriers to accessing services, what legal rights service users have, the level of care given to service users and I will also be evaluating how legislation safeguards promote service users rights. I will examine the importance of a care value base in care settings and how it can help create positive care environments. Creating and maintaining a positive care environment requires care practitioners to be open minded as the values and beliefs of service users will differ from their own, therefore they need to have an understanding of the diverse society we live in. In order for me to gain a better understanding of how health and social care services are accessed by clients, I spent 2 days in a private residential home. I interviewed a senior carer relating to creating positive care environments and also spoke to a couple of residents. Therefore I will be focusing on the care of older people. I will not be naming any of the residents I spoke to or the residential home for confidentiality reasons. How Service Users Accessed the Residential Home The residential home provides personal care and accommodation for up to 20 people who are 65 and over. Firstly the service user visits and gets information about the home to help them decide whether it's the right residential home for them. Before service users move into the home, their needs are assessed to ensure that they can be met. Once the service users needs are assessed and the service user thinks that the home is suitable for him/her then they are given a written contract stating the terms and conditions with the home. Many of the residents I spoke to said that their children found the home for them because they were unable to look after them due to work commitments. ...read more.

Middle

This particularly applies to older people as they like to do things for themselves and don't like being perceived as needy, as one of the residents said that they wish they could do everything for themselves as she then wouldn't have to worry about whether carers really want to help her but it would also make her feel happy that she doesn't have to rely on other people. In the residential home, all the residents felt comfortable with living together and were able to go up to their room if they wanted privacy. But many of the residents said that they would have more freedom and be more comfortable if their families cared for them. One resident said that a part of her does feel rejected by being put in care but she also understands that her children have a family of their own now to care for. She said that if she did live with her family they wouldn't be able to care for her as well as the carers in the residential home because of their work commitments. Another resident said that they feel safer in a home because there is always a carer there whereas if she was cared for by family then she wouldn't have someone 24/7 to help her. But many of the residents miss there families greatly. 3. Physical and Geographical Barriers It is very difficult to provide equal access to health care. Services are more accessible to people who have cars than to people who do not. Many older people do not drive and many of the residents I spoke to rely on relatives to take them to care services. Also, services are more accessible to people if they can be reached by public transport. However people with a physical disability may find it difficult using public transport such as buses because they are not wheelchair accessible. ...read more.

Conclusion

Care settings should provide practitioners with a code of conduct. The code of conduct states all the instructions that carers must follow in order to create a positive care environment. Practitioners need to obey their organisations code of conduct otherwise they will fail to create a positive care environment. There are clear training requirements set by the Care Standards Act 2000 for care workers. In order to improve quality of care environments and the quality of care service users receive staff training is essential. This will result in the staff having greater knowledge of care issues and the rights service users have as well as their own rights, which will help them create a more positive care environment. Care Values: In order to create a positive care environment, care practitioners need to be able to apply the care value base in their care setting. The care value base is a series of principles that guide care practice. It offers guidance on five main areas: Confidentiality, Effective Communication, Empowerment, Respect for individual choice, identity, culture and beliefs and Anti-Discriminatory Practise. If carers demonstrate all these values, then service users will perceive the care setting positively and will be pleased with the service they have received. It is also very important for carers to understand equality. They need to make sure that they give the same quality of service and equal opportunities to all their clients in order to create a positive care environment. Anti-discriminatory practise should also be promoted by carers to help create a positive care environment. This would help clients to feel that they are equally and fairly treated. Equality: In order for a care environment to stay positive care practitioners need to show an understanding of equality. Carers need to be aware that equality does not necessarily mean treating everyone in the same way, as different service users may have different needs that need to be met. For example, people with different cultural backgrounds will have different needs from one another. It is important that carers respect and support the diversity of people's experiences, lifestyles and backgrounds. ...read more.

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