• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Review the use of verbal communication with service users in care settings and its purpose.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Review the use of verbal communication with service users in care settings and its purpose. There is a variety of ways in which care workers can communicate with service users positively, and in a way which makes the service user feel valued and respected. The different methods of communication include: * Verbal communication - which involves active listening and making appropriate spoken responses * Non-verbal communication - which can also be referred to as body language and involves things such as using eye contact when speaking with someone * Written communication - can include care plans, or booklets which let people know of the services available within the setting * Special methods of communication - such as sign language for those with a hearing impairment * Computerised communication - such as emails Verbal communication and its purpose According to Fisher (2006) in order to effectively converse with a service user, the care worker needs to have appropriate social co-ordination skills, which involves: * Listening to the service user and showing an interest in what the service user has to say - care workers must try their best to remember what has been said during conversations, to avoid having ...read more.

Middle

According to Fisher (2006) the process of verbal communication can be observed as going through a series of stages in a cycle, with: * The first stage - being the expression of thoughts * The second stage - as observing the other person's body language * The fourth stage - is listening to the other person's verbal response * The fifth stage - is decoding and properly understanding that response * The sixth stage - discussing new ideas Verbal communication is important in care settings for obtaining information from service users such as their state of health, preferences, views and opinions, so that they can be actively involved in their care. It is therefore important to make sure that any information which has been obtained is accurate, by making sure that the service user has fully understood what has been said in the conversation. For example, any terminology which could be confusing needs to be explained. Example A nurse asks a service user 'have you voided today'? The service user may not even know what this means and so just answer 'no'. ...read more.

Conclusion

By giving information in an easy to understand way, service users will be able to give the appropriate responses and the care worker can then obtain the correct information needed. Using appropriate verbal communication is also important when giving, or receiving, instructions. For example, in a primary school a teacher may have to give instructions to pupils on how to take a test; instructions should be clear and easy to understand. Short sentences are often best when giving instructions, for example a teacher might say to pupils before a test 'no talking, or looking over at others' work', and then perhaps follow this with an explanation: 'so we know that no one is cheating'. Another example of when a care worker may have to give instructions is if a nursery is having an outing to the park, and the carer needs to let the children know what is expected of them; the children may be given instructions such as 'hold hands with a buddy, and stay on the path with everyone else', and again could be followed by an explanation of why they have to follow the instruction: 'so that you don't get lost'. 980 Words ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Healthcare section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A rather short essay but a good start on communication skills.

The writer has only really discussed the communication cycle but it is in quite a bit detail and includes some good examples.

This would be an excellent essay to introduce communication skills.

4 Stars

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 24/10/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Healthcare essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    History of the National Health Service.

    3 star(s)

    low income population, upper classes could afford to pay for their own treatment and were generally excluded from using the municipal hospital facilities. These hospitals grew in number and by the end of the thirties there were roughly 1750 municipal hospitals in England and Wales, and these provided training facilities for both Nurses and Doctors.

  2. The provision of health and social care services adapt themselves in order to meet ...

    improving the communication links between agencies, for example the school needs to give student the opportunity and information that they will need in unfortunate circumstances, this would include the child line services. Make a positive contribution One way in which the schools would be able to create a personalised learning

  1. Barriers In Communication In Health & Social Care

    This can restrict the quality of communication. The patient may need to tell the doctor things faster than usual and might not get through everything they needed to discuss. Therefore, the patient may not get all the care they need.

  2. Unit 21 Nutrition for health and social care

    The rest we can make ourselves. Complete proteins provide all the eight essential amino acids and include meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, soya and cheese. Proteins are used in the body in a variety of ways. All tissues in the body contain protein, including hair and bone.

  1. Outline current legislation, guidelines policies and procedure within own UK Home Nation affecting the ...

    Eating disorders such as anorexia or bulimia. Signs of possible emotional abuse 1. Depression, aggression, extreme anxiety, changes or regression in mood or behaviour, particularly where a child withdraws or becomes clingy 2. Obsessions or phobias 3. Sudden underachievement or lack of concentration 4.

  2. Unit 21 Nutrition for Health and social care

    If an individual does not get enough vitamin C then they could become ill with scurvy, their teeth would fall out and old scar tissue can open up and start bleeding, a individual would also may look pale and could feel depressed.

  1. Unit 5 Anatomy and physiology in health and social care

    The space within the ER is called the ER lumen. Smooth ER transports materials through the cell. It contains enzymes and produces and digests lipids (fats) and membrane proteins; smooth ER buds off from rough ER, moving the newly-made proteins and lipids to the Golgi body, lysosomes, and membranes.

  2. Research Methodology for health and social care

    a care home manager observing an individual resident may identify that they may need more assistance with personal care and discuss this with individual. Making decisions about treatment or care to meet the individual?s needs. It is important and necessary to carry out a specific study, or research project,

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work