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Supportive Relationships in a care setting.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

SUPPORTIVE RELATIONSHIPS CORE PRINCIPLES OF CARE > 1990's a basic set of principles were identified > Originally known as Care Value Base > These principles are- o To foster equality and diversity of people o To foster peoples rights and responsibilities o To maintain confidentiality of information > Identify the core of care and are the minimal standards for service providers to work to. > Summed up in five words to which vulnerable people should be treated with: o dignity and respect, o equality -the quality of care provided and quantity of care depending on the individual needs o fairness - retaining the individuals rights and responsibilities as citizens regardless of support needed o privacy - confidentiality and them being able to have their own space. BUILDING EFFECTIVE RELATIONSHIPS > Professional and personal friendship relationship differs according to Neil Moonie (2005) because o Professional work within a framework of values o Professionals work always involves a duty of care for the welfare of the individual o Professional relationships involve establishing appropriate boundaries > It is up to the professional to ensure the client and their relationship is kept within the boundaries of the legislation and professional bodies > Contemporary views encourage the person centred approach where the vulnerable are kept in the centre of interaction which hasn't always been the ...read more.

Middle

> Clients can feel empowered from the care they receive through giving them choice and input on their support plans. Clients can feel secure from knowing when and who will be visiting her to give support. The client will feel her needs are taken into account and she is being treated with respect and dignity and not isolated and ignored as they will be encouraged to speak about their feelings due to being part of a person centred approach. The client will feels confident and informed if the communication between services is clearly recorded so everyone knows whats happening. The client will feel listened to and cared about due to services meeting the diverse needs of the client and ensured they are able to receive the same care as everyone else (not discriminated because of old age 'its what you expect with your age' > Inclusive practice like above is where the individual is fully involved in the decision making process. PROTOCOLS FOR SHARING INFORMATION > Good work practice is evident when there are clear protocols or understandings within organisations about confidentiality and the sharing of information which should only be given out on a need to know basis for example a cook at a day centre needing to know about allergies. ...read more.

Conclusion

MEETING THE INDIVIDUALS NEEDS > Usually when the client wants to discuss a problem it is called 'presenting problem or need'. However it also leads to identifying needs which are less visible. > Physical, intellectual, emotional, social, cultural and spiritual > When the needs assessment of the individual is being completed, all aspects should be explored with the individuals consent. Being responsive to the needs and concerns ensures that the person centred approach is being effective. > Flexibility is the key to responding positively to the individual and their needs > Procedures use to be rigid and plainly for the benefit of the organisation and the staff. Now it is plainly focussed on the needs of the individual, > If the client makes a complaint, the complaints procedure should be user-friendly and the process needs to be fully explained and support should be offered either through the organisation or the independent advocate. > Supportive practices includes also the family and the carers. The individuals wishes may need to be taken into account and confidentiality should be observed closely at all times. The individual may not wish their family to know things such as if they have experienced sexual abuse, which must be respected. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This essay is a little confusing. It does not really meet the title that is stated at the start. It covers several relevant issues but fails to actually discuss how it can build supportive relationships.

It could be enhanced by trying to relate it to relationships. At times, the work lists rather than explains. It the writer were to discuss these areas in greater depth it would enhance the essay.

***

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 26/09/2013

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