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Unit 14 Physiological disorders - diabetes and stroke

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Introduction

´╗┐Lissa Williams Unit 14 Physiological Disorders Task One ? P1, P2, P3, M1 Explain the nature of two physiological disorders https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSv5dMeIr3d3798dx1IQwSjHH_jtmy1ky7khIzs3DzhCKNRelJJ Diabetes Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is where the body does not produce enough insulin, or the body's cells do not react to insulin. This is known as insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1 diabetes. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may be able to control your symptoms simply by eating a healthy diet and monitoring your blood glucose level. However, as type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, you may eventually need medication, usually in the form of tablets. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity. Obesity-related diabetes is sometimes referred to as maturity-onset diabetes because it is more common in older people. Read more about type 2 diabetes, and use the BMI healthy weight calculator to check you are a healthy weight. ...read more.

Middle

* The hypothalamus is a gland in the brain which is responsible for regulating certain metabolic processes or maintaining the body's status quo. Without the hypothalamus there would be no link between the nervous system and the endocrine system as the hypothalamus "tells" other organs, such as the pituitary gland, what to secrete and when to do it. * The pituitary gland is a small gland in the brain that is about the size of a pea. For such a small gland, it is responsible for producing most of the important hormones that the body manufactures. * The thyroid gland is a gland located in the lower part of the neck and it produces a hormone called thyroxin. Thyroxin regulates the metabolism and is important to healthy bone growth and aids in the development of the brain and nervous system. Stroke Outline of a person's face and neck, illustration of the brain For your brain to function, it needs a constant blood supply, which provides vital nutrients and oxygen to the brain cells. ...read more.

Conclusion

The brain structure and function The brain, together with the spinal cord, makes up the central nervous system (CNS). This is the 'control centre' that coordinates the body?s functions. The largest portion of the brain?the cerebral cortex?has two hemispheres. The right hemisphere of the brain controls nonverbal communication, emotions and spatial orientation or sense of body position. The left hemisphere of the brain controls the right side of the body and is the brain?s language center. The left hemisphere also is largely responsible for analytical thinking. The main parts of the brain are: * The cerebrum (the forebrain) the cerebrum is divided into a right and a left hemisphere and is composed of pairs of frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobes. * The cerebellum (the hindbrain) the cerebellum, the second largest area, is responsible for maintaining balance and further control of movement and coordination. * The brain stem - the final pathway between cerebral structures and the spinal cord. It is responsible for a variety of automatic functions, such as control of respiration, heart rate, and blood pressure, wakefulness, arousal and attention Brain structure ...read more.

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