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Unit 5-The principles underpinning the role of the Practitioner working with children

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Introduction

Unit 5-The principles underpinning the role of the Practitioner working with children Section 1 E1 Practitioners have the responsibility to maintain a professional relationship with children, families, colleagues and other professionals in a range of settings. When working in early years setting you will be expected to work with other professionals that may be on the same site as yourself or from the community where they will be required to come into your setting. For example if a practitioner is working in a children's centre a speech therapist may work on the same site but is you work on a small rural nursery the therapist may visit your setting regularly when required. When working as an early year's practitioner there will be codes of practice that underpin your practice. These will state how you as a professional are expected to conduct yourself within your role. Codes of practice are not the law but are set out by the employer for all employees to comply with within the setting, and will be relevant to pieces of legislation. Your employer will guide you through the codes of practice set out and they will also be available in your staff handbook. Codes of practice should be referred to and reflected upon frequently as a matter of good practice and to improve your own learning and performance. For example working in childcare you will find codes of practice related to, special needs, safeguarding children, managing behaviour, data protection, health and safety, confidentiality and many more. The main responsibilities of an adult working with children are, work part of a team, encourage parent's active involvement and participation, meet the learning needs of each individual child and work according to the principles. As an adult working with children it is important that you are reliable and accountable for your own actions. Form the children's point of view, reliability equates to security. If an adult is inconsistent in their approach, children will fell unsecure and may react with negative behaviour. ...read more.

Middle

expanding and are up dating so you as a childcare practitioner would need to be familiar with all the new laws and regulations as this would affect your performance. For example the EYFS had up dated there legislation to 0-5 years where it used to be 0-3 years practitioners would of had to be familiar with this as this would affect their own performance. Also self-appraisal and reviews are a good way to improve your own performance. As your personal and professional qualities are reviewed, therefore it promotes good practice. This would mean it will identify on your poor performance. Often targets are reviewed and it allows you and your manager to discuss are range of things in the setting. It evaluates your performance and what training might you need in the future are might be beneficial to you to help improve your performance. These self-appraisals are carried out annually and it's a chance to 'blow your own trumpet' say what you think you are good at. Section 3 E5 The ten principles that underpin work with children: 1) The welfare of the child is vital. This means when decisions are made, the needs and interests of the child come first. 2) Keeping children safe and maintaining a healthy and safe environment by making sure the children are not at risk, by doing things like lock all the doors after arrival and departure lock all cleaning products away so there not in the reach of the children. Making sure that the outdoors is safe for the children to go and play no rubbish and sharp objects etc. Also by keeping children safe is to make sure at departure times the practitioners make a note of who are the children's parents and guardians are and that when they come to pick the children up they have security questions to answer before the practitioners hand the child over unless it's the regular person that comes to pick the child up. ...read more.

Conclusion

It has also investigated the effects of the time the children are in pre-school and the different levels of staff qualification. While investigating the effects of pre-school, this project has demonstrated the important input of family's factors to children's development, including social class and behavioural influences such as family activities that enhances young children's learning. The positive influence of early childhood education has been demonstrated, especially children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those children who are at risk of developing special educational needs. "'EPPE shows the importance of quality and the benefits of quality,' says Professor Sylva. 'Good-quality early years provision transforms the learning of all children, but especially those at risk of later difficulties, and they become better and more efficient learners." http://www.nurseryworld.co.uk/news/1017225/Analysis-EPPE-show-value-money/ A The Effective Provision of Pre-school Education (EPPE) works with children of key stage 1- age 7. This is supporting children and practitioners as everyone is working together and shielding children from harm and giving them the chance to gain the best they can do. The impact of this is working with pre-school children on their cognitive and social behaviour outcomes, and works with the children on their backgrounds, family and their learning environment. The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) develops in pre-school education and supports children in practice. It also works with children to the end of primary school key stage 2 - age 11. EPPE investigates the relative influence of family backgrounds, supporting children on how their atmosphere is at home and supports children by keeping them safe, this is supporting practitioner as everybody is working together and the children are getting extra help and support also to maintain they get the best opportunities, it also supports home learning, so children should be doing work and developing their skills at home as well being educated in schools, getting help from parents and support from them, putting the children first. The children would get monitored to progress their development and how well they are doing, works with children and supports children in developing more skills. ...read more.

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5 star(s)

This is a very good essay with a considerable amount of information about the factors that affect practice in a child care setting.

It is accurate and detailed throughout. There are areas that could be expanded but it is perfectly adequate to stand as it is.

*****

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 07/06/2013

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