• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The most important reason for Wolseys fall from power was his failure to obtain a divorce for Henry VIII- How far do you agree with this statement?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'The most important reason for Wolsey's fall from power was his failure to obtain a divorce for Henry VIII'- How far do you agree with this statement? Due to Wolsey's constant victories, he was able to sustain power for 15 years, outlasting the King's other advisers. Yet unlike his role as 'alter rex' his fall was swift and dramatic, which came after his failure of obtaining Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon. In regards to this, it seems clear that this is the reason why Wolsey fell from power, yet there are possible contributing factors that one must take into consideration. One reason is that Wolsey was undoubtedly unpopular in court throughout his time. Within his time at court he acquired many enemies such as the King's minions because of his less than wealthy upbringing. This may have impact the king due to the closeness of him and the minions- who were influencing the King to oppose Wolsey. This is evident in his rivalry against the Duke of Norfolk and Suffolk who were the figureheads in the Tudor court. ...read more.

Middle

and the Treaty of London (1518), in addition to the many wars with France and Scotland helped him remain in power as it brought the King what he had wanted. Wolsey's naturally intelligent nature supplied him with the managing of getting Henry popularity from abroad as the Field of the Cloth of Gold and Treaty of London both show. The Field of the Cloth of Gold gave Henry the chance to show his wealth whereas Wolsey's decisive thinking in the treaty of London gave Henry international popularity; it was even described as a 'glittering success' by Susan Doran. The wars helped Henry establish England as a worthy foreign power which again was one of his aims. Due to these many successes, Henry believed he could entrust Wolsey, which is the reason as to why he did not listen to enemies of the Cardinal, in addition to the fact that Wolsey, on the whole, was delivering to Henry what he wanted. However, during the later years of the Cardinal's position, Wolsey had more trouble in meeting the King's ever expanding requirements. ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition to the marriage, factions at court related to this. Due to the Boleyn faction at court, Wolsey had major opposition, and because of Henry's infatuation with Anne Boleyn, the faction (including Duke of Norfolk) had the upper hand over Wolsey, thus providing a contributing reason for his downfall. To conclude, Ultimately the King's great matter of 1527 onwards was the most important reason for Wolsey's downfall because it was the most important matter that related to the King regarding his personal needs; a wife and a male heir he so desperately desired. Despite this being the main reason, it is true that his unpopularity was a factor that contributed. His many enemies at court provided reasons for Henry to remove him but he didn't because Wolsey was able to do what Henry asked. However, when he failed, Henry took into consideration these enemies, especially the Duke of Norfolk because of his family ties with Anne Boleyn. Therefore Wolsey's ultimate downfall was the failure of the divorce but his unpopularity and minor failures such as the subsidies were contributing factors. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

This is a concise and accurate response with clear understanding of events and sound evidence. The author is able to weigh up the relative importance of factors to reach an impressive conclusion. 5 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 26/07/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. What problems did Elizabeth I face at the begining of her reign?

    This is also a decision which would be closely linked to who she chose to marry. She could also try to be neutral to both France and Spain, however for the Pope to accept her as ruler of England Elizabeth would need either French or Spanish support.

  2. How successfully did James deal with religious problems throughout his reign?

    to put pressure on the Habsburg cousins to pull out of the Palatinate. After 1618 there were no executions of Catholics and fines were issued less often. James' pro-Catholic foreign policy favoured Catholics in England although it resulted in much tension in parliament.

  1. Why was there a revolution in France in 1789

    Calonne's idea was to abolish the land tax and make a new tax, called the 'Vingtiemes'. This tax was similar to the land tax, although it had one difference; the nobility were also required to pay it. This may have solved the problem, the nobility had a lot of money and they currently not being taxed.

  2. A study of the dramatic role of women in Richard III.

    And brief, good mother, for I am in haste.' Unlike the rest of the characters his mother sees through him very early on. From seeing through him and knowing of his wickedness she wishes that she had never born such a vile son, 'O ill-dispersing wind of misery!

  1. Economic and social issues were the main cause of Tudor Rebellion in Tudor England. ...

    The Northern Earls also used religion to attract support from the peasantry as this concerned them. Northumberland confessed to their supporters that their main aim was religion however it seemed that it was more personal. On the other hand, these rebellions were different.

  2. Religion was the most serious problem facing Elizabeth in 1558? How far do you ...

    Finance was also a major issue for Elizabeth. Money was important; it gave a country security and presented the idea of wealth and power - a good image. Without this Elizabeth and England would be weak. Elizabeth had inherited around £300,000 in debt from Mary, a huge sum of money.

  1. What best explains the problems Henry III faced in England after 1258?

    On the expedition, he left with an ‘impressive’ £35,000 to regain John’s lost Angevin territory, amassed from a period of financial reform, and yet returned to England with debts of £15,000, which was half of the Crown’s annual cash income.

  2. What was the impact of the Poor Law Amendment Act on the relief of ...

    This reflected a change in public attitude to poverty in general from disgrace to misfortune. Society was seen to have a duty of care towards its vulnerable citizens. The irony of the poor rate was that parishes with the highest number of poor had to charge more than the prosperous parishes, which resulted in increased hardship and prosperity.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work